Good Riddance to a Medal; Remote-Control Skill Does Not Compare to Valor under Fire

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 13, 2013 | Go to article overview

Good Riddance to a Medal; Remote-Control Skill Does Not Compare to Valor under Fire


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

This administration certainly loves drones, but even that ardent passion has limits. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel on Tuesday put a stop to production of a medal that was to be awarded to drone operators, and not a moment too soon.

It wasnAAEt just the idea of the Distinguished Warfare Medal that offended good sense. The real outrage was ignited by the goofy idea to give it precedence over medals awarded for bravery and valor. The Distinguished Warfare Medal would outrank the Bronze Star, the Purple Heart, the Air Medal and the Air Force, Army and Navy/Marine Commendation Medals for valor.

ItAAEs hard to imagine such a bizarre idea coming from anywhere but this White House, where ignorance often trumps good sense. Nobody who has served in uniform, who has survived through enemy fire (or even read about valor and heroism) would have thought such a medal a good idea. Drone operators can strike anywhere in the world with a flick of a mouse, working in the air-conditioned comfort of secure military bases in the United States or Europe. They require great skill and dexterity and they serve with honor, but risk no more than carpal tunnel syndrome or a blister on a thumb as they manipulate a videogame-style controller. That holds no comparison to a soldier risking life and limb on the battlefield.

National Commander John Hamilton of the Veterans of Foreign Wars channeled the collective feeling of his organizationAAEs 1.9 million members in hammering the department to reconsider. The VFW just adamantly believes that medals that can only be earned in combat must rank higher than new medals awarded [for service] in the rear, Mr. Hamilton wrote.

The lobbying effort persuaded Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Good Riddance to a Medal; Remote-Control Skill Does Not Compare to Valor under Fire
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.