History of Art Buff; Fashion Model and Cambridge University Graduate Lily Cole Swaps the Catwalk for Art Studios in an Artfully Insightful New Series

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), March 16, 2013 | Go to article overview

History of Art Buff; Fashion Model and Cambridge University Graduate Lily Cole Swaps the Catwalk for Art Studios in an Artfully Insightful New Series


Q: This is your first foray into presenting. What attracted you to the series? A: It was the student or the artist in me. I was drawn to the idea of spending that time with the artists and then trying to communicate their perspectives to a wider audience.

Q; You studied History of Art at Cambridge University. How did you become interested in the subject? A: My mum is an artist and I was brought up in a very creative environment. Art has always been incredibly important to me. In its best moments, whatever the medium, it allows a free anarchic spirit of expression to be channelled that, I think, is of fundamental importance to our world. Seeking to find a voice as yet unfound, ears closed to contemporary noise - it's the way new horizons are drafted.

Q: What can we expect from the series and how does it differ from other programmes about art? A: It wasn't planned in the way most programmes are. I fought to try to make the structure as loose and spontaneous as possible, then asked the artists for their input on how we spent the time. I know this was challenging for the producers but I wanted to create a very relaxed, informal space with the artists, so they would feel comfortable to be themselves. This is how the best conversations I've had in life have always come about. Hopefully what you have is an honest and more intimate reflection of the person and thoughts behind the work. And it was more fun for me.

Q: During the series, you meet artists from all over the world who work in different styles and mediums. Did you find that their practices and motivations varied? A: The polarities within the mix were intentional, and hopefully you learn something from their differences. They spoke different words, and expressed them in different languages. You'll have to watch the show to figure out the nuances.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

History of Art Buff; Fashion Model and Cambridge University Graduate Lily Cole Swaps the Catwalk for Art Studios in an Artfully Insightful New Series
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.