Mima and the Art of Drawing; Exhibitions: Mima

Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England), March 22, 2013 | Go to article overview

Mima and the Art of Drawing; Exhibitions: Mima


WORK by some of the most recognised names in the art world are unveiled at mima today.

The wraps have come off their new exhibition, Tracing the Century: Drawing as a Catalyst for Change.

ALSO at mima...

YOU'LL be transfixed by the sights and sounds of British artist Haroon Mirza.

His new exhibition, Untitled Song, is an eclectic mix of found bits of furniture, analogue electrical appliances: radios, speakers and turntables, all of which are frequently interspersed with fragments of other artists' works.

With this in mind, it's easy to see why Mirza has often described himself as a composer, someone who pieces together "sculptural assemblages", lo-fi in nature, that have instrumentality at their heart.

Mirza takes existing material and alters its function to compose works of organised noise that are often heard before they are seen, filling the spaces in which they are arranged.

Straight from the Tate's collection, the exhibition features works by Picasso, Warhol, Gauguin, Bacon, Emin, Cezanne, Freud, Hockney interspersed with key works from mima's own collection.

The exhibition is described as highlighting "the fundamental role of drawing as a catalyst for change Untitled Song features untitled works by James Clarkson (2011/12). Four of the sculptures were produced by Sheffield-based Clarkson and then adjusted by Mirza and combined with found furniture and acoustic equipment in a characteristically DIY way.

But probably just as striking as the work itself are the adjacent walls in the gallery which have been lined with soundproof foam that functions not only to contain the sound, but adds a strong sculptural element and another layer of material and texture. …

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