Educational Formation (II)

Manila Bulletin, February 4, 2013 | Go to article overview
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Educational Formation (II)


There is more than enough knowledge we need to put into the store of our mind than the set we learn in school, college, and the university. In fact, the higher we go up the educational ladder, the more focused and specialized our knowledge becomes: We get to know more and more within a field of knowledge whose coverage becomes less and less. Thus, even after formal schooling, we have a wide world of knowledge we can explore and get a grasp of. It is for this reason that for all of us, formation in the educational facet has to be continuing: It is life-long. We never stop learning and acquiring more knowledge.

To keep learning and adding to our stock of knowledge requires commitment. We have to put in the effort and set aside whatever time we can snatch from our other duties. Reading, for us, is a life-time habit. We cultivate such a habit, borne out of a deep commitment to keep our mind open to more knowledge, because of our realization of who we are: We become more human and a better reflection of God, in whose image we have been created, the more knowledgeable we become. Moreover, it is clear that becoming more knowledgeable is not a matter of stuffing more knowledge into our mind: We should also become better at processing that knowledge, thinking through all that material, and drawing fresh insights and perspectives from all the stored information. This is in line with the saying: More knowledge should lead us to a higher level of wisdom; and this in turn should lead us to ever-greater understanding and love.

We should be in no doubt about where all our knowledge should lead us: to make us more broad-minded, bigger-hearted, and better-spirited. We should end up keeping our mind always open, appreciative of the ideas and opinions of others, and discerning of the many nuances that reality as well as the events and circumstances of life have to offer for the enrichment and refinement of our views and perspectives.

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