The End of HIV? the Cure Demands Social Change

By Smith, Maria | Harvard International Review, Spring 2013 | Go to article overview

The End of HIV? the Cure Demands Social Change


Smith, Maria, Harvard International Review


Although HIV statistics remain painfully high, for the first time scientists have begun to discuss the prospect of an AIDS-free generation. At the 19th International AIDS conference in Washington, DC, 25,000 activists, scientists, policymakers, and people living with HIV/AIDS convened to discuss the conference's theme, "Turning the Tide Together."

But turning this rhetoric into reality is a challenge--and not just for the community of researchers. Beneath the surface, 1.7 million individual lives are lost to AIDS every year, and many are those of young women: HIV is the leading cause of death among women of reproductive age. Women between the ages of 15 and 24 who live in Sub-Saharan Africa are eight times more likely to live with HIV than men the same age, and 76 percent of all HIV-positive women live there. In response to these statistics, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the US National Institutes of Health, claims that what is needed is the will--political, organizational, and individual--to implement scientific breakthroughs.

Because of enduring poverty, prejudice, power imbalances, and a dearth of resources, HIV-infected persons in developing countries, especially women in Sub-Saharan Africa, are denied access to advances in science and affordable AIDS prevention and treatments. Increased funding and investment in AIDS research alone will not alleviate the disproportionate suffering and deaths resulting from contracting HIV by people in developing nations, particularly women. A concerted effort among the key players in the global health community--governments, foundations, international organizations, non-governmental agencies, drug companies, activists, researchers, and religious organizations--must occur in strategic global and local partnerships to decisively and comprehensively fight prejudice and poverty, increase awareness, and improve education. It is possible to turn the tide and eradicate AIDS, but it will take more than scientific breakthroughs.

The drop in annual AIDS-related fatalities from 2.3 million in 2005 to 1.7 million today is attributed to an increased number of people on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) drugs, first available nearly two decades ago. This, in combination with prevention, has resulted in a declining rate of infections. Targeted prevention includes condoms, drug treatment, male circumcision, and the end of mother-to-child transmission. Treatment costs less than US$200 annually, a substantial drop from US$10,000 less than two decades ago. ART drugs have been shown to stop the spread of HIV from person to person by suppressing the virus to undetectable levels. For this reason, it is crucial that all HIV-infected persons undergo treatment.

Marginalization, power imbalances, and insidious cultural gender norms leave large populations of women disproportionally more vulnerable to HIV infection than men. In Rwanda, for example, women who have been coerced into sex are 89 percent more likely to contract HIV. Food insecurity is an even more tangible leading contributor to this gender disparity. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The End of HIV? the Cure Demands Social Change
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.