'I Am the Nile': A New African Writers Series Title Chronicles the Exploits of Africa's Great Kings and Queens of Yore

New African, March 2013 | Go to article overview
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'I Am the Nile': A New African Writers Series Title Chronicles the Exploits of Africa's Great Kings and Queens of Yore


AFTER THE DEATH OF THE HEINE-mann's African Writers Series that published the work of some of Africa's great writers such as Chinua Achebe, Ayi Kwei Armah, Ngugi wa Thiongo and many others, a new imprint of African writers series has risen from the ashes. Called the Real African Writers (RAW) Children's Series, it is the baby of the South African-based Real African Publishers, which last year published the Tastes from Nelson Mandela 's Kitchen.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The new series will officially be launched on 4 June in Accra, Ghana, and subsequently in Johannesburg, Lusaka, Lagos, Addis Ababa, London and New York.

The first books to come out of the RAW children's fiction series are multi-cultural, inspirational, and very pan-African oriented. For example, there is the 100 Great African Kings and Queens that chronicles the amazing journey of Africa's great kings and queens of yore. Making the cut in this first of 10 volumes is the magnificent Queen of Sheba from Ethiopia; the inimitable last Pharaoh of Egypt, Cleopatra IV; and the irrepressible Hannibal Barca of Tunisia. Not to be left out is Emperor Mansa Musa of Mali, the richest man who ever lived.

So, why kings and queens? The answer, according to the author, Pusch Commey (who doubles as New African's correspondent in South Africa): "They were representatives of civilisations. They open a window into African and world history. The educational value is phenomenal."

Pusch Commey is a Ghanaian-born lawyer based in South Africa. He is an award-winning writer/journalist and associate editor of New African. He has written several journal articles and covered South Africa since 1999.

To Pusch Commey, Cleopatra, born 69BC, was a phenomenon. "A brilliant mathematician and businesswoman" he writes in the book, "Cleopatra understood the world better than most rulers of her time."

When the Romans ruled the known world, Cleopatra went to the palace of Emperor Julius Caeser, rolled in a Persian carpet, and had it presented to him by her servants. When the carpet was unfolded, out tumbled Cleopatra.

Caeser was so Charmed by the gesture that he invited Cleopatra to live in his palace, had children with her, planned to marry her contrary to the laws of Rome, and abandoned his plans to invade Egypt.

When Caeser was murdered in 44BC, Cleopatra went to meet the new ruler, Mark Anthony, with silver oars, purple sails and Nereid handmaids, with her erotes fanning her. She was dressed as the goddess of love, Aphrodite. Mark Anthony went crazy over Cleopatra and divorced his second wife, Octavia, the sister of his co-ruler Octavius Caeser, in favour of Cleopatra. She declared "I am the Nile".

Then there was Hannibal. The untold story of his epic exploits against the Roman Empire was the African Numidian Horsemen, the skilled javelin throwing mercenaries from Numidia, present day Algeria.

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