A Gentle Journey through the Truth in Rocks

By Prothero, Donald R. | Skeptic (Altadena, CA), Winter 2013 | Go to article overview

A Gentle Journey through the Truth in Rocks


Prothero, Donald R., Skeptic (Altadena, CA)


A Review of The Rocks Don't Lie: A Geologist Investigates Noah's flood by David R. Montgomery.

W. W. Norton & Company.

2012. $26.95 320 pps

ISBN-13: 978-0393082395

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

CREATIONISTS ARE NOTORIOUS FOR distorting or denying the facts of biology (evolution), paleontology (denying the evidence of evolution in fossils), physics and astronomy (denying modern cosmology), and many other fields. But some of their most egregious attempts to twist reality to fit their bizarre views are found in "flood geology," a concoction of strange ideas about the geologic record that clearly demonstrates how little actual experience any of them has in looking at real rocks. I dissected this issue in great detail in Chapter 3 of my 2007 book, Evolution: What the Fossils Say and Why it Matters (Columbia University Press, New York).

David Montgomery, however, devotes an entire book to the topic of geology and creationism. The title is tantalizing, making one wonder if this is just another creationist book disguised as real science. But the content is relatively straightforward. Montgomery is a well-respected geomorphologist at the University of Washington who has studied landforms around the world, and he makes it clear up front that he is not about to support flood geology. Instead, he embarks on a long narration that is part travelogue, part history, and part description of the breakthroughs in biblical scholarship that long ago led to the rejection of biblical literalism by anyone who can actually read it in the original.

His first chapter looks at a number of places on earth where he has done research on Ice Age glacial dams and floods, and reveals that they show no evidence of being part of a global flood. In Chapter 2, he recounts the evidence of Grand Canyon with the creationist's Grand Canyon: A Different View in his hands as he hikes, and remarks (p. 16) simply that "the story was nothing like the tale I read in the rocks I had spent the day hiking past." Unfortunately, he does not provide enough detail (or illustrations of key outcrops) to really debunk the interpretations of "flood geologists."

The next two chapters then recount the early history of geology, from the Greeks and Romans, to the Middle Ages, when scholars and natural historians tried to shoehorn all of earth history into the narrow accounts of Genesis, and finally were forced to reject the idea of Noah's Flood by about 1840--all without losing their Christian faith. At the end he remarks (p. 91), "After Cuvier, the drive to find evidence of Noah's Flood in the rocks was well and truly dead, although modern creationists would later resurrect the idea." The next chapter then carries the historical narrative through the birth of modern geology, with Hutton, Buckland, and Lyell, and the eventual realization that the earth is immensely old with (in Hutton's words) "no vestige of a beginning."

Chapter 8 then jumps to another topic altogether: the discovery by George Smith and the others of ancient Sumerian and Babylonian flood myths that were directly plagiarized by the authors of Genesis. In Chapter 9, Montgomery looks at flood myths in cultures all over the world, and shows that there is no evidence they are describing a single universal flood of Noah. Chapter lo then goes through the history of modern American creationism, from the Kentucky "Creation Museum" to the birth of fundamentalism, to George Macready Price and his amateurish efforts to create a new "flood geology" in the 1920s through the 1950s. Throughout this account, Montgomery points out how far from reality Price's imaginary geology was, and how it was fought by genuine Christian geologists like J. Laurence Kulp, who attempted to reconcile Genesis and geology without violating the laws of earth science. Kulp's efforts were eventually overshadowed by the later backlash into extreme fundamentalism, and marked the end of any attempt at scientific rationality trumping literalism in the creationist community.

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