Introductory Remarks by Scott C. Fulton

By Fulton, Scott C. | Proceedings of the Annual Meeting-American Society of International Law, Annual 2012 | Go to article overview

Introductory Remarks by Scott C. Fulton


Fulton, Scott C., Proceedings of the Annual Meeting-American Society of International Law


Twenty years after the Rio Earth Summit, the 2012 UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) offers an important opportunity to consider anew the challenge of sustainable development and to provide guidance and inspiration for the path ahead. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is among the discussants within the U.S. government effort led by the U.S. State Department to advance a positive and constructive intervention at the Rio+20 conference. This includes advancing the discussion to pursue effective environmental governance, particularly at the national level, within the "institutional arrangements" component of the Rio+20 agenda. This will serve to highlight the critical importance of effective governance and will help catalyze an international effort to more fully operationalize ideals, objectives, and commitments through government systems and modalities that are fully functional.

Within this context, the World Congress on Justice, Governance and Law for Environmental Sustainability, which will immediately precede the Rio+20 conference, is expected to bring together judges, attorneys general, auditors general, and others integral to effective implementation of environmental law. They will share ideas, best practices, challenges, and successes in a way that, if projected forward, should enhance environmental governance, reflecting its nature as a system of interrelated and mutually reinforcing parts. (1) This discourse is integral to shifting focus from the need for environmental legislation to the quality of implementation of that legislation at the national level. Without effective implementation, there can be no protection from global pollution, and no level playing field for international commerce, including green commerce.

This premise is based on the need for a basic floor of environmental protection that can be experienced around the world. This floor will rest upon the rule of law as its foundation. Successfully implemented, it will be the heart of a governance structure that makes science and environmental data the primary language of environmental protection, guarantees participation in environmental decisions by affected communities, ensures true accountability by government and industry alike, eliminates institutional inefficiency and confusion, and brings swift and meaningful justice to environmental grievances and disputes.

We have learned from experience that without these interrelated and mutually reinforcing parts working in harmony, environmental laws on the books will not produce health and environmental benefits in reality. Taken together, these are the precepts that are integral to effective governance: effective laws, disclosure, participation, accountability, coherent institutional arrangements, dispute resolution, and environmental public integrity. The end state of sustainability is absolutely dependent upon these precepts. These are the ingredients that lift the world of law off the page and propel it into action. (2)

In order for environmental laws to be effective, they should be clear, even-handed, implementable, and enforceable. Laws and regulations should provide a clear roadmap for translating general legal mandates to facility-specific requirements and ensure that the vital interests and views of all stakeholders are considered. Furthermore, laws and regulations must be implemented and enforced in order to achieve desired environmental results.

Environmental information should be collected and made accessible to the public through disclosure. Routinely disclosing available environmental information to the public enables civil society to take an active role in ensuring accountability while fostering community engagement. Public access to environmental compliance data reported by the regulated community or amassed by government through tools like Pollutant Release and Transfer Registries can encourage businesses to pay more attention to polluting activities, expose waste in production processes, and help them make adjustments towards more efficient materials management. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Introductory Remarks by Scott C. Fulton
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.