The Sound of What Could Have Been; A Vivid Reimagining of the Beatles' Story Is One of the Highlights of the New Season of Sky Playhouse Productions. for Cardiff-Based Musician and Fab Four Fan Martin Carr (Inset) It Also Provided a Source of Inspiration on Many Levels. Dave Owens Listens In

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), April 20, 2013 | Go to article overview

The Sound of What Could Have Been; A Vivid Reimagining of the Beatles' Story Is One of the Highlights of the New Season of Sky Playhouse Productions. for Cardiff-Based Musician and Fab Four Fan Martin Carr (Inset) It Also Provided a Source of Inspiration on Many Levels. Dave Owens Listens In


It was a long-standing friendship that brought Martin Carr to his latest project. The former guitarist and songwriter with '90s indie stars The Boo Radleys has embroidered new Sky Playhouse drama Snodgrass with a hugely listenable soundtrack.

The one-off reimagining of John Lennon as a 50-year-old who left The Beatles in 1962 after a musical spat is an offbeat treat from start to finish thanks to the keen quirky humour of writer David Quantick and Carr's innate melodic sensibilities.

Based on the novella by Ian R MacLeod, it seems like the musician, originally from Merseyside but who now lives in Cardiff, was hooked as soon as the first seeds of this offbeat tale were sown.

"I'd been friends with David Quantick for years because he'd written about the band when he worked for the NME," explains Carr.

"He sent me a copy of a sci-fi compendium that Snodgrass was a part of. He knew that I'd like it and I loved it.

"It was weird that I'd never come across it before because I was a big Beatles fan.

Anything remotely connected with them I would have heard, seen or read before. I couldn't believe how real it was and how funny it was.

"Quantick sent me the story years ago. He was obsessed with it. He said 'if I ever get this made you can do the music'. I hear that all the time, so I forgot all about it for a couple of years. He mentioned it to me again last year but I still didn't take it seriously, then he got in touch saying, 'Right we're doing it, I want you to do the music'. So he and the producer came to Cardiff to talk about it.

"It would have been unforgivable if I'd messed it up," continues the 44-year-old, who first started listening to The Beatles as a 10-year-old growing up on the Wirral, across the water from Liverpool.

"So I started writing in the summer of last year and the songs just flowed.

"I'd already had a couple of songs written that perfectly fitted what was wanted. And it didn't take me long to write the majority of the rest."

Although Carr hadn't tackled anything like this previously, he found the process effortless, chiefly because, in this instance, he wasn't writing about himself.

"It was probably one of the easiest things I've ever done. It sounds weird saying that because I've never said that about music before. I really struggle with writing lyrics, but because I was being someone else all the stuff that gets in the way when you're writing about yourself was just gone."

The guitarist who penned such stirring anthems as Wake Up Boo!, It's Lulu, Lazarus and C'Mon Kids, says that he could wholly identify with Lennon's character in this leftfield story.

"Snodgrass is a book about disappointments - that situation where you only get that one chance to realise your full potential and he blew it, I could relate to that, because I thought that's me, that's how I thought about myself; constantly living in the past, regretting and wanting to go back and do things differently. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Sound of What Could Have Been; A Vivid Reimagining of the Beatles' Story Is One of the Highlights of the New Season of Sky Playhouse Productions. for Cardiff-Based Musician and Fab Four Fan Martin Carr (Inset) It Also Provided a Source of Inspiration on Many Levels. Dave Owens Listens In
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.