Golf's Young Master

By Kerr-Dineen, Luke | Newsweek, April 19, 2013 | Go to article overview

Golf's Young Master


Kerr-Dineen, Luke, Newsweek


Byline: Luke Kerr-Dineen

Guan Tianlang, 14, is the sport's newest prodigy.

There's perhaps no better way to understand golfer Guan Tianlang's accomplishment at the 2013 Masters this April than to let the cold, hard numbers tell the story:

At all of 14 years old, he was the youngest person to play the Masters--arguably the most prestigious sporting event in the world--by more than two years. He was 18 years younger than Adam Scott, the eventual winner, and more than 20 years younger than the average age of the field. His 58th-place finish in a field of more than 100 not only made him the best-finishing amateur in the tournament, but left him ahead of 13 different major winners. And all this after he was assessed a one-stroke penalty for slow play.

Guan had traveled from China to prepare for the Masters three weeks before the tournament, earlier than the other competitors, and played dozens of practice rounds with a local caddie carrying his bag.

"I tell you what: he hits it good. Think about it. He's not even in high school yet," said Tiger Woods, who played a practice round with Guan, at a press conference. That feeling was echoed by Gary Player, another golfing legend: "It is just incredible. If I had been in his position when I was 14, I would have been in tears."

Guan may be the latest young phenomenon to rock the golfing world, but he's by no means the first. Indeed, in a game where players can continue to compete at the top level well into their 40s and 50s, those who find themselves immortalized in the game's history books often burst into the limelight, like Guan, at an early age. Golf certainly isn't the only sport where future icons can make headlines at a young age, but it is among the friendliest to younger players. …

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