Are Genes Making You Too Fat for Your Jeans? Can't Shift Those Extra Pounds, despite Diet and Exercise? Research Suggests the Answer Could Be Hidden in Your DNA

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), April 25, 2013 | Go to article overview

Are Genes Making You Too Fat for Your Jeans? Can't Shift Those Extra Pounds, despite Diet and Exercise? Research Suggests the Answer Could Be Hidden in Your DNA


Byline: Caroline Jones

TODAY is DNA Day, celebrating the discovery 60 years ago of the unravelling of the double helix of genetics - the basis of all life.

This explains all the small differences between us - from eye colour to fingernail shape.

And now the latest research suggests your individual genetic coding doesn't just determine what you look like, it might also be the secret weapon when it comes to losing weight.

So can we really blame weight gain on our genes? Although all of us have similar make-ups, hundreds of thousands of tiny differences exist. These are what make each of us unique - including how our bodies respond to different types of food and exercise.

This is why two people on the same diet can end up with different results.

In other words, it accounts for the annoying way your best friend shed two stone on the Dukan Diet but when you tried it those extra pounds stayed firmly on.

Scientists have even discovered a sweet tooth gene that makes you predisposed to crave cakes and chocolate, which seems highly unfair.

But the good news is, as well as working against you when fighting the flab, your genes can also be utilised in your favour to help ensure better diet and exercise success.

How DNA dieting works The discovery of thousands of genes responsible for functions in the body, plus advances in DNA testing, mean it's possible to have a bespoke diet and fitness plan created for you.

It will be fine-tuned to work in harmony with every tiny quirk of your own metabolism.

J Dr The Nordiska diet was developed with Newcastle University experts and is based on the premise that genetic testing can determine the right food and exercise regime for your body.

These genes relate to how quickly an individual metabolises fat and carbohydrate, appetite control and muscle activity.

And after a test you are given one of four diet types: low fat, low carb, low glycaemic or healthily balanced.

"The era of everyone following the same plan regardless of body shape, age and family history is gone," said Dr Daniel Meyersfeld, who has designed DNAFit, the world's first bespoke fitness plan based on your genes.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Are Genes Making You Too Fat for Your Jeans? Can't Shift Those Extra Pounds, despite Diet and Exercise? Research Suggests the Answer Could Be Hidden in Your DNA
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.