How Heritage Sites Rake in a Historic [Pounds Sterling]2bn

Daily Mail (London), May 9, 2013 | Go to article overview

How Heritage Sites Rake in a Historic [Pounds Sterling]2bn


Byline: Alan Simpson Scottish Political Reporter

SCOTLAND'S ancient monuments and historic sites are worth [pounds sterling]2.3billion a year to the economy.

Treasures such as Edinburgh Castle and Skara Brae in Orkney are worth more than the fishing industry and are about to come under one management body for the first time.

The value of Scotland's past was disclosed yesterday as ministers unveiled plans for the new body that will take control of developing heritage sites.

Historic Scotland and the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments will be merged and a quango set up in their place, along with Scotland's first historic environment strategy.

Historic Scotland looks after 345 properties on an annual budget of [pounds sterling]60million, but has been criticised amid claims of poor management.

The Policy Institute think-tank urged sweeping reforms of Historic Scotland and called for it to open up its portfolio of buildings and monuments to the private sector or face a future of 'stagnation and underuse'.

In its report, Old Stones in a New Setting: Breathing New Life Into Scotland's Built Heritage, the institute says private sector companies and charities should be allowed to lease and operate all Historic Scotland sites. …

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