Justice, Accused of Bias, Requests Hirings; 44 Civil Rights Lawyers Sought

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 9, 2013 | Go to article overview

Justice, Accused of Bias, Requests Hirings; 44 Civil Rights Lawyers Sought


Byline: Jerry Seper, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Questions have surfaced over a Justice Department plan to hire 44 more attorneys for its Civil Rights Division, which has been accused of bias by members of Congress and been described in a government report as having deep ideological differences that have fueled disputes harmful to its operation.

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr.'s 2014 fiscal budget says the bulk of the attorneys being sought by the Justice Department are earmarked to help meet the nation's civil rights challenges, to support the department's vigorous enforcement of federal civil rights laws and to expand criminal enforcement efforts against police misconduct.

But several senior Republicans said the Civil Rights Division historically has hired lawyers based on their political views and not their legal experience, and changes need to be made before any new lawyers are brought on board.

Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa, the ranking Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, said it will take a new kind of leadership to eliminate the politicization and polarization of the Civil Rights Division.

He said Congress needs to continue its aggressive oversight of the department and, when necessary, offer legislative reforms to ensure that bad behavior doesn't continue for another decade at the division.

Mr. Grassley noted that the Justice Department's Office of Inspector General first reported on the division's politicized hiring policies in 2008 and found similar problems in a follow-up report in March.

He said any hiring within the division needs to value intellectual diversity to put to rest any perception that employment is based on politics. Given what he called the inspector general's findings of flawed criteria used to hire attorneys, he said, Congress should demand that hiring not be so skewed that it leads to hiring almost exclusively liberal attorneys at the expense of candidates with 'stellar academic credentials and litigation experience.'

Rep. Frank R. Wolf, Virginia Republican and chairman of the House Appropriations subcommittee on commerce, justice and science, has called for an independent review of the Civil Rights Division. He said the inspector general's report made it clear that the division had become a rat's nest of unacceptable and unprofessional actions, and even outright threats against career attorneys and systemic mismanagement.

In a letter to Mr. Holder, Mr. Wolf acknowledged that problems within the division were not isolated to his tenure as attorney general but said it was his responsibility to resolve them.

It is unacceptable that these practices have continued on your watch, Mr. Wolf wrote. As the head of the department, you bear ultimate responsibility for the serious abuses that have occurred over the last four years. I take these issues very seriously, both because of my responsibilities as chairman of the House CJS Appropriations subcommittee, which funds the Justice Department, but also because I have been a stalwart supporter of voting rights enforcement.

Sen. John Cornyn, Texas Republican, went to the Senate floor Wednesday to outline his opposition to the nomination of Thomas E. Perez, who heads the Civil Rights Division as an assistant attorney general, as President Obama's labor secretary.

He said that under Mr. Perez, the Voting Rights Division compiled a disturbing record of political discrimination and selective enforcement of our laws. He said the inspector general's report found that the Voting Rights Section under Mr. …

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Justice, Accused of Bias, Requests Hirings; 44 Civil Rights Lawyers Sought
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