My Friend, Carmen Beauchamp Ciparick

By Lippman, Jonathan | Albany Law Review, Winter 2012 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

My Friend, Carmen Beauchamp Ciparick


Lippman, Jonathan, Albany Law Review


December 2012 saw the retirement of Senior Associate Judge of the Court of Appeals Carmen Beauchamp Ciparick following a long and brilliant career as a lawyer and a jurist. I have had the enormous good fortune to call her my friend for close to four decades. Judge Ciparick and I have spent a lifetime together in the courts that we love so much.

Our friendship began in the mid-1970s, when Judge Ciparick was the Chief Law Assistant of the New York City Criminal Courts and I was the Principal Court Attorney in the Civil Branch of Supreme Court, New York County. We had so much in common--both of us in the early stages of our professional lives, starting families, and building careers in the New York courts. We did not know then what lay ahead and that we would eventually be colleagues together on the Court of Appeals almost forty years after we first met. But what was abundantly clear, even in those early days in the court system, was that Carmen Beauchamp Ciparick was an exceptionally talented lawyer of great intellect, as well as a warm, delightful, and gracious person. She was genuine and caring, and we had a wonderful, mutually supportive relationship in our respective roles in the courts.

From day one, Carmen Ciparick was forging new paths. She worked during the day as a teacher in the New York City public schools while attending St. John's University School of Law at night, where she was one of only eight women in her class. Carmen became a member of the bar at a time when women--much less Latinas--were rare and not always warmly welcomed in the legal profession. Her first job after law school was for the Legal Aid Society in the South Bronx, where she served the legal needs of the less fortunate in society. Although her clients were suspicious of a woman lawyer, she quickly won them over. She met this first challenge in her legal career, as she approaches everything in life, with an even-keeled temperament, a great sense of humor, and an uncommon balance and humanity.

Judge Ciparick continued to be a trailblazer throughout her career in the courts. She joined the court system as assistant counsel to New York's Judicial Conference, the predecessor to the Office of Court Administration, where she was the only woman lawyer. She was in short order asked to serve as Chief Law Assistant of the New York City Criminal Court, where she was the first woman to supervise the court attorney pool. She soon became Counsel to the Deputy Chief Administrative Judge for New York City. When Mayor Koch appointed her to the New York City Criminal Court bench in 1978, she was the first Puerto Rican woman to serve as a trial judge in New York State's history. She was elected to the New York State Supreme Court in 1982. I personally was delighted that she was elected, with the added bonus for the two of us that we again were working together, as I was the Chief Clerk of the Supreme Court in New York County at the time. We were, as always, the best of friends and so enjoyed our years together at the majestic Supreme Court courthouse at 60 Centre Street in Manhattan.

On December 1, 1993, Mario Cuomo appointed Carmen Beauchamp Ciparick to the Court of Appeals, the first Hispanic and the second woman to be appointed to the high court--and she was off to Albany. Judge Ciparick's nineteen years on the Court of Appeals have left a lasting legacy both on the Court of Appeals and on the legal profession in our state.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

My Friend, Carmen Beauchamp Ciparick
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.