Statistics Show That Women Have Always Had a Higher Life Expectancy Than Men. Ho

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 26, 2013 | Go to article overview

Statistics Show That Women Have Always Had a Higher Life Expectancy Than Men. Ho


Statistics show that women have always had a higher life expectancy than men. However, a recent report by the Pan American Health Organization's Woman, Health and Development Program shows that women are also more likely to suffer from long-term or chronic diseases.

What is the reason for this trend?

According to the report, the lack of information, apathy and fear of a negative diagnosis, are the three main factors affecting why women do not go to the doctor for medical tests that could prevent or detect serious diseases such as cancer, at an early stage.

Culturally, Latino women also tend to take their role as mothers and wives seriously. They worry about food and the well-being of their children and their spouse, but their to-do list does not include the appointment for that mammogram or Pap test prescribed by the doctor for themselves. Many continuously postpone their visits to the doctor, sometimes waiting one, two, or even more years without making appointments for preventive tests.

It is important for women to make time in their busy schedules to take care of their health. They need to make regular checkup visits to the doctor, and undergo blood tests to measure their cholesterol, triglycerides, blood sugar, hemoglobin and calcium levels.

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