Curiosity Deficit

By Herman, David | New Statesman (1996), May 3, 2013 | Go to article overview

Curiosity Deficit


Herman, David, New Statesman (1996)


Small Wars, Far Away Places: the Genesis of the Modern World, 1945-65

Michael Burleigh

Macmillan, 592PP, [pounds sterling]25

In a devastating review of Eric Hobsbawm's memoir, Interesting Times, Perry Anderson attacked the way Hobsbawm contrasted the massive loss of life in the mid-20th century, especially in Europe, with the postwar "Golden Age". Whose Golden Age, Anderson asks: "The years from 1950 to 1972 included the Korean war, the French wars in Indochina and Algeria, three Middle Eastern wars, the Portuguese wars in Africa, the Biafran conflict, the Indonesian massacres, the Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution and the American warin Vietnam. Total dead: perhaps 35 million."

The terrible conflicts in the post-colonial world are the subject of Michael Burleigh's new book. He would surely agree with Anderson except for one thing. The losses were much worse than even Anderson imagined. Between 55 and 65 million people died during Mao Zedong's Great Leap Forward, he writes. Add the three million killed during the Chinese civil war and you reach close to 70 million dead in postwar China alone.

Small Wars, Far Away Places is full of such startling statistics. As Africa broke away from empire, "The initial wave of statehood cost less life than the number of Americans killed each year on the roads." By the end of the Second World War, "Britain owed India [pounds sterling]1,321m"--40 per cent of its postwar debt. At the end of the Japanese-Soviet campaign, "Some 600,000 Japanese civilians and POWs were deported to the Siberian gulags." Any of these facts is worth a book in its own right.

Burleigh's book is also bursting with fascinating anecdotes. He has a great gift for bringing history to life. By the time Mao's army rolled into Beijing, the Communist leader had not been in the Chinese capital for 30 years. "It was the only big city he knew. This was one reason he revived it as China's capital; another was that there he was closer to the Soviets ..." Herbert Morrison, who succeeded Ernest Bevin as British foreign secretary in 1951, said that granting black Africans self-government was akin to giving a ten-year-old "a latchkey, bank account and a shotgun".

Burleigh writes pungent, pithy prose. Franklin D Roosevelt "was credulous towards Stalin, regarded Churchill as an out-of-date imperialist, detested de Gaulle and reposed great faith in China". Dwight Eisenhower "was the last US president to be born in rural 19th-century America". Discussing the Vietnam war, he writes: "Like a primitive man first encountering a screw in a baulk of wood, the US response was to apply more force.

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