Holder the Horrible; Top Cop Has a Long History of Constitutional Abuses

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 31, 2013 | Go to article overview

Holder the Horrible; Top Cop Has a Long History of Constitutional Abuses


Byline: Jeffrey Kuhner, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. has disgraced his office and engaged in a systematic abuse of power. He has also lied under oath. He can no longer remain as our nation's chief law enforcement office. If anything, he should be facing criminal prosecution for numerous misdeeds.

Mr. Holder is in trouble. The media has turned on him - including former liberal supporters. Republicans and some Democrats are demanding that he step down. The reason: His office has repeatedly assaulted the First Amendment.

The Justice Department secretly obtained the phone records of numerous reporters and editors at The Associated Press in an effort to investigate leaks over the release of classified information. Instead of pursuing the government leaker, however, the FBI went after AP reporters. The president of AP recently revealed that thousands and thousands of records and documents were seized by government officials. The government engaged in a massive intrusion of press freedoms.

According to the Daily Beast, Mr. Holder felt a creeping sense of personal remorse regarding his actions. He is now desperately trying to placate an angry press corps, which rightly feels betrayed. After all, no one has been a bigger supporter of the Obama administration than the liberal media. To their horror, they have found out the unthinkable: The administration has been spying on them. President Obama's cronies have sought to intimidate journalists and their government sources. This is why most liberal-leaning media outlets - The New York Times, AP, CNN and the Huffington Post - turned down Mr. Holder's request for an off-the-record meeting with the Washington bureau chiefs of major print and Internet news operations. It's obvious damage control.

Yet the media scandal is widening. FBI agents targeted Fox News reporter James Rosen. In 2009, Mr. Rosen approached a State Department official to investigate the administration's North Korea policy. Apparently, classified information was disclosed. Hence, the Justice Department probed Mr. Rosen's personal and work emails, seized his phone records, tracked his movements and even monitored the phone calls and text messages of his parents. In fact, a Justice Department affidavit labeled Mr. Rosen a possible criminal co-conspirator who potentially violated the Espionage Act. Think about this: A reporter in the process of doing his job - gathering news information to enlighten the public about important world affairs - was deliberately singled out and criminalized by our government. …

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