As a Muslim, I Struggle with the Idea of Homosexuality-But I Oppose Homophobia

By Hasan, Mehdi | New Statesman (1996), May 17, 2013 | Go to article overview

As a Muslim, I Struggle with the Idea of Homosexuality-But I Oppose Homophobia


Hasan, Mehdi, New Statesman (1996)


'T is the season of apologies--specifically, grovelling apologies by some of our finest academic brains for homophobic remarks they've made in public.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The Cambridge University theologian Dr Tim Winter, one of the UK's leading Islamic scholars, apologised on 2 May after footage emerged showing him calling homosexuality the "ultimate inversion" and an "inexplicable aberration". "The YouTube clip is at least is years old, and does not in any way represent my present views ... we all have our youthful enthusiasms, and we all move on."

The Harvard historian Professor Niall Ferguson apologised "unreservedly" on 4 May for "stupid" and "insensitive" comments in which he claimed that the economist John Maynard Keynes hadn't cared about "the long run" because he was gay and had no intention of having any children.

Dare I add my non-academic, non-intellectual voice to the mix? I want to issue my own apology. Because I've made some pretty inappropriate comments in the past, too.

You may or may not be surprised to learn that, as a teenager, I was one of those wannabe-macho kids who crudely deployed "gay" as a mark of abuse; you will probably be shocked to discover that shamefully, even in my twenties, I was still making the odd disparaging remark about homosexuality.

It's now 2013 and I'm 33 years old. My own "youthful enthusiasm" is thankfully, if belatedly, behind me.

What happened? Well, for a start, I grew up. Bigotry and demonisation of difference are usually the hallmark of immature and childish minds. But, if I'm honest, something else happened, too: I acquired a more nuanced understanding of my Islamic faith, a better appreciation of its morals, values and capacity for tolerance.

Before we go any further, a bit of background--I was attacked heavily a few weeks ago by some of my co-religionists for suggesting in these pages that too many Muslims in this country have a "Jewish problem" and that we blithely "ignore the rampant anti-Semitism in our own backyard".

I hope I won't provoke the same shrieks of outrage and denial when I say that many Muslims also have a problem, if not with homosexuals, then with homosexuality. In fact, a 2.009 poll by Gallup found that British Muslims have zero tolerance towards homosexuality. "None of the 500 British Muslims interviewed believed that homosexual acts were morally acceptable," the Guardian reported in May that year.

Some more background. Orthodox Islam, like orthodox interpretations of the other Abrahamic faiths, views homosexuality as sinful and usually defines marriage as only ever a heterosexual union.

This isn't to say that there is no debate on the subject. In April, the Washington Post profiled Daayiee Abdullah, who is believed to be the only publicly gay imam in the west. "[I]f you have any same-sex marriages," the Post quotes him as saying, "I'm available."

Meanwhile, the gay Muslim scholar Scott Siraj al-Haqq Kugle, who teaches Islamic studies at Emory University in the United States, says that notions such as "gay" or "lesbian" are not mentioned in the Quran. He blames Islam's hostility towards homosexuality on a misreading of the texts by ultra-conservative mullahs.

And, in his 2011 book Reading the Quran, the British Muslim intellectual and writer Ziauddin Sardar argues that "there is absolutely no evidence that the Prophet punished anyone for homosexuality". Sardar says "the demonisation of homosexuality in Muslim history is based largely on fabricated traditions and the unreconstituted prejudice harboured by most Muslim societies". He highlights verse 31 of chapter 2.4 of the Quran, in which we come across 'men who have no sexual desire' who can witness the 'charms' of women".

I must add here that Abdullah, Kugle and Sardar are in a tiny minority, as are the members of gay Muslim groups such as Imaan. Most mainstream Muslim scholars--even self-identified progressives and moderates such as Imam Hamza Yusuf in the United States and Professor Tariq Ramadan in the UK--consider homosexuality to be a grave sin. …

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