TOUR TO CELEBRATE CITY MUSIC HISTORY; Attraction to Show 'More Than Beatles'

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), June 6, 2013 | Go to article overview

TOUR TO CELEBRATE CITY MUSIC HISTORY; Attraction to Show 'More Than Beatles'


Byline: TINA MILES Showbiz Reporter @tinamilesuk

A NEW tourist attraction to celebrate Liverpool's musical heritage beyond The Beatles is set to be piloted in the city.

Beat In The Mersey tours aim to give an insight into other genres of music - everything but the Fab Four.

The pilot tours will take place at the Cunard Building on Sunday as part of the Mersey River Festival and have been backed by Liverpool musician Peter Hooton.

Christine Chellew, producer of the tours, said: "Long before The Beatles Liverpool was alive with music.

"The name Beat In The Mersey represents both the heartbeat of the city and the beat that was in the waters of the Mersey created by all the people who travelled to and from America, Ireland, Africa and beyond. They brought with them their sounds and cultures that Liverpool embraced.

"We all know Liverpool is a melting pot of cultures but this is something to be celebrated beyond The Beatles. It was this beat that created the famous four from the sounds they received and that shaped their music."

The tours will be narrated by Liverpool historian Ron Noon.

Former The Farm front man Hooton said he was "excited" to be involved as musical director.

He added: "Everyone is familiar with the story of The Beatles but this tour will explore the links between Liverpool and America and how music travelled to the States via emigration and the slave trade and came back to Liverpool via rock 'n' roll and how this shaped Merseybeat. …

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