The Way to a Woman's Art; the Work of Female Artists Is Being Showcased at Two Exhibitions in the City, Writes JULIE CHAMBERLAIN

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), June 14, 2013 | Go to article overview
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The Way to a Woman's Art; the Work of Female Artists Is Being Showcased at Two Exhibitions in the City, Writes JULIE CHAMBERLAIN


Byline: JULIE CHAMBERLAIN

IT seems to be women's month in Coventry's art world, with two exhibitions opening showing lots of different types of work by female artists.

At Roots gallery, FEMME:5 features work by five artists plus a case about the work of the gallery's director Sian Conway.

Amber Merrick-Potter has the largest number of pieces on show. She explained that the large portraits, incorporating materials such as henna and tea, aren't her usual works, but they are striking and character-filled, depicting people she saw on a residency in Tamil Nadur, India. Other more abstract works including Sacred Hearts and Sacred Groves are filled with colour and words and a mixture of materials including harvested rainwater.

Caroline Walker's works are some black and white nude photographs, comfortable in her body and space. Charlotte Walker is showing holographic works - walk from side to side and she moves, naked and sensual, on the floor, and there are other photos of her blowing into a balloon within a balloon, with the sound effects playing around you.

Indira Prasad's work, I Want My Mum, I Want To Go Home, is a Sarah Lucas-influenced work featuring stuffed tights writhing over a stuffed chair with an umbrella above. Karen O'Toole's white fleecy creatures, one on a plinth and one on the ground, are familiar from a previous Coventry University degree show, and are attractive if a little spooky.

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