Spontaneous Combustion: Oil and the Battle for the Falklands

By Bruggink, Frederik | Harvard International Review, Summer 2013 | Go to article overview

Spontaneous Combustion: Oil and the Battle for the Falklands


Bruggink, Frederik, Harvard International Review


Located near the southeastern tip of Argentina, the sparsely populated Falkland Islands remain one of the main diplomatic hotspots on the world stage. British-Argentine disputes over the archipelago, which culminated in 1982 in a military standoff between Argentina and Thatcher's UK, have marred relations between the two countries for over a century. Another war over the islands seems unlikely, but recent developments have added a new dimension to the conflict: the discovery of oil by British companies. As oil becomes a new variable in the equation, the race for the Falkland Islands is heating up.

The oil frenzy has intensified in recent months with announcements of concrete drilling plans. Two major oil companies, Premier Oil and Rock-hopper, have partnered to pump oil from the northern Falkland area and expect the first barrels to be produced by 2017. The total value of the barrels from the area is expected to amount to over $30 billion, an impressive number considering the relatively small size of the oil field. Argentina was quick to condemn British exploration in the contested region, drawing parallels with past colonial exploitation by the British. This particular analogy serves as a powerful argument with Argentina's neighbors and other former colonies--a number of Latin American nations have now openly criticized the British decision to pursue the exploitation of these natural resources.

The opposition of Latin American nations should serve as a warning for the drilling company and its investors. In recent decades, Latin American nations have been characterized by their adherence to territorial integrity, to the point where foreign companies involved in natural resources exploitation are increasingly faced with nationalization. While Argentina under Kirchner has not focused on the concept of territorial integrity with the degree of hostility that countries like Venezuela have, allowing British drilling to proceed unabated would be a source of great humiliation and public outcry. Las Malvinas, as the Falkland Islands are called in Spanish, are tenaciously claimed by the Argentine population and are often sources of protests in Buenos Aires.

The rationale behind this tenacious defense of territorial integrity is deeply rooted in colonial history. Any inferiority complex borne by the former status of occupation is counteracted by acts of self-assertion. Historical precedents obviously impair any defense of colonialism, and links can easily be made with current European investments in former colonies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Spontaneous Combustion: Oil and the Battle for the Falklands
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.