Everyday Fathers, Doing What Comes Naturally; Heroism Is Built into Men Who Are True to Their Families

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 17, 2013 | Go to article overview

Everyday Fathers, Doing What Comes Naturally; Heroism Is Built into Men Who Are True to Their Families


Byline: Gary Bauer, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The decline of fatherhood is one of the most devastating social trends of the past 50 years, but not all dads are deadbeats or absentees. If only our culture celebrated the everyday dedication and sacrifice of the millions of American fathers who lovingly fulfill their vocation.

Instead, we celebrate Bill Clinton. Last week, the former president and serial adulterer received a father of the year award from the National Father's Day Committee. The culture seems deeply confused abogbut what it means to be a good father. To be father of the year, don't you have to keep your promises to your children's mother?

One argument Mr. Clinton has on his side is that at least he is present in his daughter Chelsea's life and married to her mother. That's more than millions of other fathers can say.

Forty percent of children are now born to unmarried parents, including a majority of children born to women under 30 years old. A recent study found that in Richmond, Va., 60 percent of families have just one parent, usually the mother, at home. Among black residents, 86 percent of homes are single-parent.

Our single-mom crisis was recently underscored by a Pew study estimating that women are the primary breadwinners in 40 percent of American households. The finding was hailed as an achievement for women's equality, even by the president. But the reality is far different. A majority of these breadwinner mom households are made up of single moms who averaged just $23,000 in income annually. That compares to $80,000 annually for intact families. America's income gap isn't evidence of economic failure. It's evidence of family breakdown.

Many men aren't only failing at marriage. They are also abandoning other fundamental social institutions, including employment, as well as religious and civic participation.

No wonder, then, that fathers aren't appreciated as much as mothers. A recent study in Britain found that children spend three times as much money on their moms on Mother's Day as on their dads on Father's Day. Are we that hard to shop for?

Men are often depicted negatively in the popular culture. Australian university professor Jim Macnamara examined thousands of mass-media depictions of men and found that they were portrayed mostly as cheaters, perverts or villains. …

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