Achieving Academic Standards through the School Library Program: Administrator Perceptions and Student Test Scores

By Lance, Keith Curry; Kachel, Debra | Teacher Librarian, June 2013 | Go to article overview

Achieving Academic Standards through the School Library Program: Administrator Perceptions and Student Test Scores


Lance, Keith Curry, Kachel, Debra, Teacher Librarian


As part of a larger school library impact study recently conducted in Pennsylvania, survey responses of almost three hundred school administrators were examined regarding key library practices and how well school library programs help students master academic standards.

The instructional role of the school library program proved to be essential in teaching both the American Association of School Librarian's (AASL's) Standards for the 21st Century Learner and the Common Core (CC) state standards. This article explores the perspectives shared by administrators--principals, superintendents, and others--about library practices and student achievement. Having this new evidence and learning what administrators value will help the profession strengthen advocacy efforts with school decision makers.

In 2011-2012, a group of Pennsylvania organizations--HSLC (a statewide library cooperative), the Pennsylvania School Librarians Association (PSLA), and the Education Law Center of Pennsylvania--received a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to conduct a statewide study of the impact of school libraries and librarians on student achievement. In Phase 1 of the study, the 2011 Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) reading and writing scores were correlated with existing library infrastructure--staffing, budget, collections, digital resources, and library access. In Phase 2, some of which is presented in this article, surveys of school administrators, teachers, and school librarians were examined relating to the achievement of academic standards and what administrators valued or what library-related activities they engaged in (librarians and teachers). In the absence of test data specifically assessing student attainment of the AASL and CC standards as adopted in Pennsylvania (hereafter referred to as PA/CC standards), the survey responses were compared to the schools' PSSA reading and writing test scores to verify the survey data.

LIBRARY PRACTICES AND ACHIEVEMENT OF 21ST CENTURY LEARNER STANDARDS

Administrators were asked how much they value the following key library practices. Their response options were "Essential," "Highly desirable," "Desirable," "Not desirable," or "Don't know." They were also asked to rank the instructional impact of the school library in teaching academic standards with response options of "Excellent," "Good," "Fair," "Poor," or "Don't know/not applicable."

KEY LIBRARY PRACTICES

* Flexibly scheduled library access

* Librarians and teachers coteaching units of instruction

* Librarians providing in-service professional development opportunities

* Librarians being appointed to school committees

* Librarians meeting regularly with their principals

* Librarian--teacher collaboration being addressed in teacher evaluations

Three trends emerged in school administrator responses:

* Majorities of administrators who consider key library practices as "Essential" also gave "Excellent" ratings to the library program's instructional role in teaching AASL standards. This trend is consistent with at least the past two decades of research about the impact of school libraries and librarians.

* For all four AASL standards, librarians were most likely to get "Excellent" ratings from administrators who consider it essential to address librarian-teacher collaboration in teacher evaluation. This finding suggests that when collaboration with the librarian is something on which teachers are evaluated individually, it is more likely to happen and produce positive results.

* Consistently, administrators who rated each of the key library practices as "Essential" are more likely to give "Excellent" teaching ratings for Standard 1: Inquiry-Based Learning than any other AASL standard. This trend is consistent with the growing body of research about the role of inquiry in learning, especially via library programs.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Achieving Academic Standards through the School Library Program: Administrator Perceptions and Student Test Scores
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.