Managing PLN Info and Instructional Design Challenges

By Loertscher, David V. | Teacher Librarian, June 2013 | Go to article overview

Managing PLN Info and Instructional Design Challenges


Loertscher, David V., Teacher Librarian


Warning: I will ask readers of this column to go online and comment on the ideas here.

For most of us, I suspect, we have attended conferences, read professional magazines such as Teacher Librarian, and worked our way through professional development opportunities locally in order to stay current in our jobs. However, with the development of personal learning networks, we can sit down at our computers every day and get a stream of information flowing toward us from blogs, tweets, Pinterest, Facebook, and listservs, just to name a few. And, so the question arises for us all: How much time should we devote each day in order to keep up?

Furthermore, how do we store and retrieve the best of the best ideas that stream by us so that we can use them as we interact with our faculty, administration, and other professional colleagues? As a professor, I usually send out to my students the best of what comes across my own desk that is connected to what we are working together on during the term. In turn, they take a subset of what I send out, add it to the best of what they are reading and we have a blog where we are both reading and discussing our own "Infobase" collection. Thus, instead of assigning a few articles that everyone is supposed to read, we all contribute and build our knowledge together as a collaborative. I don't think that we are perfect by any means, but the results I see when my students reflect on major topics and issues are infinitely better than what I used to get even a few years ago.

However, I am never satisfied that I have discovered a way to maximize my own learning in the small amount of time I have and wonder how you, as readers, do this? I myself every day: What is the best use of my time right now? In the amount of time I spend learning, how can I maximize what I know and am able to do?

In the area of instructional design, I have created, with the help of my graduate assistant, Jennifer Gulassa, a summary of the best of the best that information I have sent out to my students over the last three months, in the order it was sent.. Here is the Google Site and at the bottom you can add comments, questions, and other resources:

https://sites.google.com/site/bestoftheweb2013dvl/

My question to you is what do you do with a stream of information such as this?

* Bookmark it? Then what?

* Put it in "Evernote" or some other tool?

* Blog about the best of the best?

* Do nothing but know you can find nuggets when you need them?

* Is trying to organize the stream really worth the effort and time it takes?

* Is this skill something with which every student should be equipped in the current world of information and technology?

These are the questions that might lead to a conversation about both the topic of instructional design and the strategies we all use of keep on learning and growing.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Managing PLN Info and Instructional Design Challenges
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.