Time to Pass Down the Patriotism

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 3, 2013 | Go to article overview

Time to Pass Down the Patriotism


Byline: Marybeth Hicks, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

To: Marybeth

From: Patriotic Grandpa

Our (otherwise delightful) grandchildren seem to have no concept of American patriotism. By the time we were in high school, we knew much more about American history and government than they do, and we also were taught to respect and honor our country's traditions. What can we do to promote patriotism in our grandkids?

To: Patriotic Patriarch

From: Mb

A few years ago, Tonight Show host Jay Leno famously produced a Jaywalking edition for Independence Day. His man on the street interview offered some stark - albeit funny - examples of the state of our American identity.

Jay: What do we celebrate on Independence Day?

Uninformed American: Um ... the Fourth of July?

It took several attempts until, finally, a learned grandpa answered Jay's simple questions about our nation's founding, our form of government, and the people who currently occupy positions of power.

Perhaps the most disheartening interviews were the few Jay did with children. They really didn't know anything about our nation's history and heritage. That video made it clear that Americans need to do a better job of instilling in our children the values and knowledge required for good citizenship.

In the past, we assumed that our children were learning about our nation's history and culture in schools - and to be sure, many still are. But generally, they aren't taught to be patriots. The places where our children develop their worldview - through our education system, media and in pop culture - don't encourage or even value the customs of patriotism that help develop children's love for America.

In her book How to Raise an American Patriot: Making it Okay for Our Kids to Be Proud to Be American, author and blogger Marijo N. Tinlin shared the five pillars of patriotism:

? Learning about our history. You don't have to be an expert to do this, Ms. Tinlin says. It's easy to spark an interest in history within your children. …

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