Human Ecology Mentors Offer Lifelines to New Students

By Corona, Dani | Human Ecology, Fall 2012 | Go to article overview

Human Ecology Mentors Offer Lifelines to New Students


Corona, Dani, Human Ecology


When Christina Lantuh '15 imagined her first semester of college, she never foresaw visiting a professor's home for dinner, friendly conversation, and Christmas cookies for dessert. The semester-end meal, arranged by Patsy Brannon, professor of nutritional sciences, through the Human Ecology Peer Partnership Program, was filled with hearty food and advice--a sweet conclusion to the program that eased Lantuh's initial months at Cornell.

For first-year--and in many cases, first-generation--students like Lantuh, Cornell is an unfamiliar academic and social territory with a maze of classes, resources, and opportunities. Such a beginning can be as overwhelming as it is exciting.

To help incoming students get their footing, the College of Human Ecology offers a long-running Peer Partnership Program that taps faculty members and upperclass students to be role models. Since 1996, it has helped more than a thousand students start their Cornell adventure--particularly students of color and others from traditionally underrepresented backgrounds.

Under the program, each fall faculty members and upperclass student peer mentors work with groups of five to seven freshmen or transfer students. They meet for fun activities, such as trips to the clock tower, house dinners, or sporting events, where they can talk about anything from academic struggles to Cornell social life. Mentees also share at least one class paper with their mentors for a critique, and together they attend an on-campus discussion with Cornell alumni about their academic and career experiences. Finally, the program also helps to orient students--many of whom grew up far away--to Cornell's sprawling campus and the surrounding area.

"The informal interaction provides members from across the Human Ecology community chances to connect," said Verdene Lee, senior associate director of the college's Office of Admissions, Student, and Career Development, who heads the program with Gary Evans, the Elizabeth Lee Vincent Professor of Human Ecology. "The relaxed relationships usually develop and continue on unofficially into the spring and throughout students' careers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Human Ecology Mentors Offer Lifelines to New Students
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.