Autism Linked to Chemicals in Air Pollution

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 8, 2013 | Go to article overview

Autism Linked to Chemicals in Air Pollution


Byline: Elizabeth Lopatto and Nicole Ostrow Bloomberg News

Researchers seeking the roots of autism have linked the disorder to chemicals in air pollution and, in a separate study, found that language difficulties of the disorder may be due to a disconnect in brain wiring.

Researchers from Harvard University's School of Public Health found that pregnant women exposed to high levels of diesel particulates or mercury were twice as likely to have an autistic child compared with peers in low-pollution areas. The findings, published in Environmental Health Perspectives, are from the largest U.S. study to examine the ties between air pollution and autism.

One in 50 U.S. children are diagnosed with autism or a related disorder, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Children with autism may be unresponsive to people, become indifferent to social activity and have communication difficulties. A separate study from Stanford University and published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is the first to suggest that weak connections between brain regions for speaking and reward may be why.

"There isn't a lot of data to strongly point at what are the root causes of the social deficits in children with autism," Daniel Abrams, a postdoctoral research fellow at Stanford University in California, said in a telephone interview. "We think it has this important motivation and reward component to it."

The cause of autism isn't known, though genetic factors are thought to be important, according to the National Institutes of Health.

The link to air pollution was initially made in 2006 by a group led by Gayle Windham at the California Department of Health Services. Another study, published in November 2012, also found links between air pollution and autism.

"People were skeptical" of the initial report from Windham's group, said Marc Weisskopf, an author of today's study and an associate professor of environmental health and epidemiology at Harvard University's School of Public Health in Boston. "I went to do this in a larger setting, not at all convinced we would see anything."

The Harvard researchers used data from the Nurse's Health Study 2, a long-term study involving more than 116,000 nurses, begun in 1989. Within that group, the scientists looked at 325 women who had a child with autism and 22,000 women who had children without the disorder. …

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