Pimping Teenage Girls; Television Writes a Lower Exploitation Standard

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 15, 2013 | Go to article overview

Pimping Teenage Girls; Television Writes a Lower Exploitation Standard


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Hollywood loves to preach. A new study suggests that Tinseltown's famous cameras should be turned on Hollywood itself to find the sinners. Prime-time TV programmers are finding a new standard of exploitation, pimping teenage girls.

A hardy group of researchers at the Parents Television Council subjected themselves to 238 broadcast sitcoms and dramas airing during four ratings sweeps weeks in 2011 and 2012. They found that a third of what they saw rose to the level of sexual exploitation of females, according to the report released Tuesday.

The likelihood that a scene would include exploitation increased dramatically whenever a teenage girl walked near the camera, and so did the chances that she would be the butt of the joke: Girls were more likely to be the target of sexual jokes than women, 43 percent compared with 33 percent. The artificial laughter on the sound track directs the audience when to laugh and provide cues for what should be viewed as funny.

The study gives a pass to crime dramas, such as NBC's Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, in which the exploitation is typically portrayed - as the word Victims in the title suggests - as bad behavior. Things usually end badly for the perp.

Sitcoms, on the other hand, are made for exploitation. Among the examples cited are an episode of Fox's Glee, in which a pair of adolescents play a game of strip poker, and in another episode of the Fox cartoon series Family Guy, adolescent character Meg appears onstage at a sex-slave auction. This girl is perfect if you want to buy a sex slave, the auctioneer declares, but don't want to spend sex-slave money. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pimping Teenage Girls; Television Writes a Lower Exploitation Standard
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.