Gay 'Conversion' Therapy on Trial as Ex-Patients Sue Nonprofit Firm; Consumer Fraud Law Used

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 19, 2013 | Go to article overview

Gay 'Conversion' Therapy on Trial as Ex-Patients Sue Nonprofit Firm; Consumer Fraud Law Used


Byline: Cheryl Wetzstein, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A New Jersey consumer fraud case has opened a new front in the battle over conversion therapies that offer counseling to gay patients looking to become straight.

The fraud case involving services offered to four young men who once struggled with their same-sex attractions will be heard Friday. Four gay men and two of the men's mothers are suing a Jewish nonprofit corporation, saying the gay-to-straight conversion sessions were fraudulent and harmful.

Conversion counselors and their supporters say they are offering a legitimate service to willing customers, but the practice has come under sustained attack from gay-rights groups and others who question the scientific rigor and the results of the therapy methods.

The fraud plaintiffs want a jury to revoke the business license of Jews Offering New Alternatives for Healing (JONAH), declare its services deceptive and false, and order it to repay all the money the plaintiffs spent on therapy sessions, plus other costs.

In the hearing before Superior Court Judge Peter F. Bariso Jr., in Hudson County, the plaintiffs are offering a novel legal argument that cites New Jersey's Consumer Fraud Act, and say the case should be allowed to go before a jury, said Sam Wolfe, senior attorney at the Southern Poverty Law Center, who called the conversion therapy program bogus.

Counsel for the defendants said the consumer fraud law is being misused to advance a political agenda to outlaw change therapies, and promises to show evidence that some people can and do reorient themselves to heterosexuality.

JONAH was created to help people who want to live in concert with the values of the Jewish Torah, said Charles LiMandri, chief counsel of the Freedom of Conscience Defense Fund.

The defendants in the case include JONAH, co-founder Arthur Goldberg and JONAH-affiliated counselor Alan Downing.

The lawsuit, first filed in November, is being heard as New Jersey Gov. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gay 'Conversion' Therapy on Trial as Ex-Patients Sue Nonprofit Firm; Consumer Fraud Law Used
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.