Honoring the Right of the Ballot; What America Must Do to Prevent Election Fraud

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 24, 2013 | Go to article overview

Honoring the Right of the Ballot; What America Must Do to Prevent Election Fraud


Byline: Ben S. Carson, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

I have had the opportunity to visit many countries, and I have taken it upon myself to inquire how people in other nations prevent voter fraud. Even those from Third World countries tell me that everyone has some type of official voting credential that is nationally recognized. It seems only logical that you would want to ensure that only legitimate constituents of a region would be able to vote on issues relevant to that region. Nevertheless, certain groups and individuals in America have begun to agitate the populace about the unfairness of a system that requires voter identification. The word racism is tossed around so easily by those intent on creating division and victimhood instead of unity. The energies of every faction of our society would be much better spent by legitimately analyzing the reasons why so many Americans don't vote and how we should address that issue, not only prior to a national election, but at all times.

Tens of millions of Americans who could have voted did not during the latest election. In my travels and interactions with tens of thousands of Americans in recent months, it has become clear to me that many people have tuned out of the political process because they are disgusted with both parties. I've been particularly saddened by the elderly individuals who told me that they are simply waiting to die and have given up on America.

There are countries in the world, some with mandatory voting and some with voluntary voting, where the turnout of eligible voters is greater than 90 percent. The percentage of our population who vote has been declining steadily since the 1960s. This is a serious problem in a country that was designed for the people. In our latest national election, thousands of members of our military serving overseas were unable to obtain absentee ballots in a timely fashion and were essentially disenfranchised even though they were risking their lives for our freedom. This should be upsetting to every citizen in this country, but many have become so accustomed to news like this that it simply doesn't faze them anymore. I can go on with many examples of the inefficiencies and unfairness in a process that is essential to a democratic nation. Instead, let's turn our attention to some potential solutions, which tend to be much more efficacious than complaining.

A great deal of the technology that would be necessary to properly identify voters and defeat voter fraud already exists. Almost everyone uses credit cards these days, and the transactions are done electronically. …

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Honoring the Right of the Ballot; What America Must Do to Prevent Election Fraud
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