Tech Nation: Looking at Consumers through a New Lens

Marketing, August 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Tech Nation: Looking at Consumers through a New Lens


Forget the geek cliches, it's time to embrace technology as a new definer of consumer groups, writes Liz McMahon.

The ways in which brands can target and communicate with consumers have evolved massively in the past 20 years, not least with the advent of digital media and the rapid penetration of technology into our everyday lives. The ways in which we communicate with each other and keep ourselves informed and entertained has diverged across platforms and devices, making content much more accessible and controllable for the consumer.

Yet how we define and understand the audiences for brands has not necessarily changed to keep pace. The traditional demographics we use to segment and understand consumers can feel outdated when used in isolation. Just look at the huge interest generated by the BBC's take on social classes, released earlier this year. We need to find new ways of looking at people, and classifying the nation, that are helpful to clients and agencies and can be used across different sectors and brands.

Tech Nation is a new study that does just that.

A research programme devised by Newsworks in partnership with Kantar Media, it presents a more modern way of looking at people - through their ownership of, attitudes to and use of technology. The study, which involves analysis of 24,000 TGI Clickstream panellists, combined with ethnographic and omnibus research, investigates consumers' attitudes to technology, the devices they own, purchase journeys and media consumption.

There has long been a view that technology is the preserve of the young Typically, we associate those who are most engaged and best-equipped as young, perhaps slightly geeky, men. Tech Nation dispels this myth. Today everyone needs technology as part of their social interaction, shopping and entertainment. It is no longer a luxury or niche interest.

What's also interesting is the way in which more recent developments such as the tablet have been taken up by a broader and older audience than we've seen with other technologies in the past. At the same time, developments in TV have particularly caught the imagination of family age groups. Our study demonstrates that engagement with technology reaches far outside the 'digital-native' generation.

The study has wide application across brands and the way in which we reach different audiences. The relationship between media and technology is a close one; Tech Nation adds a new dimension to planning across all sectors.

There are five groups defined by their use of and attitude to technology:

Tech Rich - have a passion for technology and a lust for the latest device. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Tech Nation: Looking at Consumers through a New Lens
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.