A Class Act in Glass; SCULPTURE When the National Glass Centre Reopened in June after a PS2.3m Refurbishment, the Most Eye-Catching Innovation Was the New Gallery for Temporary Exhibitions. the First of These Features the Work of Erwin Eisch. as David Whetstone Reports, It Sets the Bar Very High

The Journal (Newcastle, England), July 30, 2013 | Go to article overview

A Class Act in Glass; SCULPTURE When the National Glass Centre Reopened in June after a PS2.3m Refurbishment, the Most Eye-Catching Innovation Was the New Gallery for Temporary Exhibitions. the First of These Features the Work of Erwin Eisch. as David Whetstone Reports, It Sets the Bar Very High


We all know glass can be beautiful, especially with the light shining through it. We also know it can be useful. Think windows, cooking utensils, lenses.

But glass as art that makes a political or satirical point, that makes us smile or squirm? Maybe that's something new to a lot of us.

The first exhibition in the light and airy new gallery at the National Glass Centre is devoted to the work of Erwin Eisch and here you will find plenty of pieces that do not pander to conventional notions of beauty.

Being made of glass, Eisch's artworks are innately fragile. Knock them over - God forbid - and they would probably do what glass is famous for doing.

But actually, sitting against the pristine white walls of the gallery and beneath the gently flattering lights, they evoke a kind of strength.

They are bumpy and lumpy and often painted in garish colours. They are human heads with all the imperfections that entails. They blow raspberries at the idea that glass is fey or fragile or - like windows - there to serve without being seen. You'll want to stroke them.

Eisch is known as one of the founding fathers of studio glass, meaning the idea of glass as an artistic medium rather than something utilitarian.

He was born in 1927 in the Bavarian town of Frauenau and was apprenticed to his father, master engraver at a glass factory.

Eisch could have gravitated towards a career in industrial glassware but he had an artistic temperament.

When not engaged in studying the intricacies of factory-produced glass, he studied painting - this in the era of Jackson Pollock, the American renowned for covering canvases with drips and dots. He emerged as something of a rebel.

Eisch started to make glass objects and to display a sense of humour which didn't always sit easily with gallery owners. He was mischievous, satirical, politically aware.

A fateful meeting in Germany with the American glass artist Harvey Littleton changed the course of both their careers.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Class Act in Glass; SCULPTURE When the National Glass Centre Reopened in June after a PS2.3m Refurbishment, the Most Eye-Catching Innovation Was the New Gallery for Temporary Exhibitions. the First of These Features the Work of Erwin Eisch. as David Whetstone Reports, It Sets the Bar Very High
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.