SONA(W), What?


Thirteen days after President Benigno S. Aquino III's fourth State of the Nation Address (SONA), Pinoys still couldn't get enough of the anticipated annual report of his administration's accomplishments.

Proof of this post-SONA fever was the "Kung Ako SONA si PNoy-: A Post-SONA Assessment" of the University of the Philippines Diliman community held three days after the July 22 SONA.

As expected, the UP community led by professors and student council leaders from the School of Economics (SE), National College of Public Administration (NCPAG), College of Mass Communication (CMC), and College of Social Sciences and Philosophy (CSSP) dissected, aspect by aspect, Aquino's report and pondered on the nation's progress a year after the last SONA.

'MISSING' ROAD MAP

Economist and SE professor Dr. Benjamin Diokno was the first to critically assess the report in the forum held at the SE auditorium. He urged the President to implement a clear and comprehensive road map for the next three years to better address national problems such as inadequate infrastructure, institutional flaws and corruption, and competitiveness enhancement. "The Philippines (Gross Domestic Product) grew by 7.8 percent in the first quarter of 2013, but the country remains the poorest among the five original ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) economies," Diokno says.

The country's Gross National Income for 2012 stood at only $2,470 for each person, lower than those of Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, and Indonesia.

Diokno added that 463,000 more Filipinos were poorer in 2012 than in 2009, blaming the government's "lack of decisiveness, policy consistency, and policy credibility."

He also criticized Aquino's "serious underspending" in public infrastructure, as shown by the current Mindanao power crisis, and the "restrictive economic provisions" in the 1987 Constitution, especially the "60-40 ownership" rule.

"In a globalizing world, we should be more open," he points out, adding that corruption in the country has "barely lessened," tagging policemen, public officers, and justices as his corruption "Hall of Shame" winners.

WORK IN PROGRESS

NCPAG dean Edna Estifania Co said that Aquino's reform agenda is facing an uphill battle, as many of the country's issues (e.g. Freedom of Information Bill, structural defects in governance, and various human rights violations, etc.) are "left unaddressed."

Co described the report as merely "a mighty proclamation and banner of achievements of his administration in the past year," as he failed to "declare clearly how we can sustain the achievements."

"Aquino dealt more with the nuts and bolts, not the big picture," she says. "The 'glowy performance' of the Aquino administration is not too good enough in fighting poverty."

Co also pointed out Aquino's failure to speed up development in the countryside, to solve the urban transportation crisis, and to effectively mitigate climate change.

Despite these, she lauded Aquino's pioneering reforms in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao, and the measures to boost the government's performance at the national and local levels, which are hallmarks of good governance. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

SONA(W), What?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.