Living a Fiction: The Documentary Film the Act of Killing Asks Indonesian Death-Squad Leaders to Re-Enact Their Crimes for the Camera. They Boast Openly about Their Massacres in What Has Become the Modern Trend of "Privatising Public Space"

By Zizek, Slavoj | New Statesman (1996), July 12, 2013 | Go to article overview
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Living a Fiction: The Documentary Film the Act of Killing Asks Indonesian Death-Squad Leaders to Re-Enact Their Crimes for the Camera. They Boast Openly about Their Massacres in What Has Become the Modern Trend of "Privatising Public Space"


Zizek, Slavoj, New Statesman (1996)


The documentary The Act of Killing, which premiered in 2012, provides a unique and deeply disturbing insight into the ethical deadlock of global capitalism. The film--directed by Joshua Oppenheimer and shot in Medan, Indonesia--reports on a case of obscenity that reaches the extreme: Anwar Congo and his friends are now respected politicians but they used to be gangsters and death squad leaders who in 1966 played a leading role in the killing of as many as 2.5 million alleged communist sympathisers, mostly ethnic Chinese. The Act of Killing is about "killers who have won, and the sort of society they have built". After their victory, their terrible acts were not relegated to the status of the "dirty secret"; on the contrary, Anwar and his friends boast openly about the details of their massacres (the way to strangle a victim with a wire, the way to cut a throat, how to rape a woman pleasurably. ...).

In October 2007, Indonesian state TV produced a talk show celebrating these men; in the middle of the show, after Anwar says that their killings were inspired by gangster movies, the beaming moderator turned to the cameras and said: "Amazing! Let's give Anwar Congo a round of applause!" When she asked Anwar if he feared the revenge of the victims' relatives, he answered: "They can't. When they raise their heads, we wipe them out!" His henchman added: "We'll exterminate them all!" and the audience exploded into exuberant cheers ... one has to see this to believe it's possible.

The film is, in a way, a documentary about the real effects of living a fiction. According to the film's makers: "To explore the killers' astounding boastfulness, and to test the limits of their pride, we began with documentary portraiture and simple re-enactments of the massacres. But when we realised what kind of movie Anwar and his friends really wanted to make about the genocide, the reenactments became more elaborate. And so we offered Anwar and his friends the opportunity to dramatise the killings using film genres of their choice (western, gangster, musical). That is, we gave them the chance to script, direct and star in the scenes they had in mind when they were killing people."

Did they reach the limits of the killers' "pride"? They barely touched it when they proposed to Anwar that he should play the victim of his tortures in a re-enactment; when a wire is placed around his neck, he interrupts the performance and says, "Forgive me for everything I've done." But this does not lead to a deeper crisis of conscience--his heroic pride immediately takes over again. The protective screen that prevented a deeper moral crisis was the cinematic screen: as in their real killings and torture, the men experienced their role play as a re-enactment of cinematic models: they experienced reality itself as a fiction. During their massacres, the men, all admirers of Hollywood (they started their careers as controllers of the black market in cinema tickets), imitated Hollywood gangsters, cowboys and even a musical dancer.

Here the "big other" enters: what kind of society publicly celebrates a monstrous orgy of torture and killing decades after it took place, not by justifying it as an extraordinary, necessary crime for the public good but as an ordinary, acceptable pleasurable activity? The trap to be avoided here is the easy one of putting the blame on either Hollywood or on the "ethical primitiveness" of Indonesia. The starting point should rather be the dislocating effects of capitalist globalisation which, by undermining the "symbolic efficacy" of traditional ethical structures, creates such a moral vacuum.

However, the status of the "big other" deserves a closer analysis--let us compare The Act of Killing to an incident that drew a lot of attention in the US some decades ago: a woman was beaten and slowly killed in the courtyard of a big apartment block in Brooklyn, New York; more than 70 witnesses saw what was going on from their windows but not one called the police.

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Living a Fiction: The Documentary Film the Act of Killing Asks Indonesian Death-Squad Leaders to Re-Enact Their Crimes for the Camera. They Boast Openly about Their Massacres in What Has Become the Modern Trend of "Privatising Public Space"
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