Human Factors Engineering Can Improve Patient Safety: Knowing How Nurses Interact with the Environment Can Help Safeguard Patients

By Tocco, Susan | American Nurse Today, July 2013 | Go to article overview

Human Factors Engineering Can Improve Patient Safety: Knowing How Nurses Interact with the Environment Can Help Safeguard Patients


Tocco, Susan, American Nurse Today


YOU'RE GETTING INTO your brand-new car to drive to work. When you try to put it in reverse to back out of your driveway, you notice you have to step on the brake first. You forget to buckle your seatbelt--and a chime activates as a reminder. When your car reaches a certain speed, your doors lock automatically. Once you get to work and park your car, you leave your keys in the ignition, and another chime reminds you to take them with you. The headlights turn off automatically.

The automobile industry has implemented these features based on an understanding of how human beings interact with their vehicles. It's an example of human-factors engineering--the scientific discipline concerned with understanding the interactions among humans and other elements of a system. Human-factors engineering applies theoretical principles, data, and methods to design in an effort to optimize human well-being and overall system performance.

Human-factors engineering (also known as ergonomics) has three domains:

* physical (workplace layout)

* cognitive (mental processes)

* organizational (communication and teamwork).

Increasingly, elements of human-factors engineering are being used to improve the safety of nursing practice. To understand how the healthcare environment can be modified optimally through this lens, we need to understand the vulnerabilities and strengths of human performance.

Threats to safe nursing practice

Many workplace conditions can reduce the nurse's performance:

* unfamiliarity with the task at hand

* inadequate time

* poor communication

* underestimation of risk

* poorly designed workflow.

Noted psychologist James Reason found the likelihood of error approached 75% when a person performed a new procedure without being aware of the potential for adverse events. Compare this to a 0.05% error rate when a skilled person who understands potential risks performs the same task. An example of leveraging human-factors knowledge is limiting the insertion of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) lines to a small team of specially trained nurses whose workflow is designed to minimize competing priorities. (See Using human-factors knowledge to improve unit safety.)

We also have increasing evidence that the following factors promote human error:

* lack of sleep

* fatigue

* illness

* boredom

* fear

* stress

* reliance on memory

* interruptions and distractions

* noise

* inadequate lighting.

Studies examining nurse fatigue have found that nurses who work shifts of 12.5 hours or longer are three times more likely to make errors. Additional studies suggest sleep deprivation can have the same dangerous effects as a blood alcohol level of 0.05%. We would never knowingly let an intoxicated nurse care for patients-- yet we routinely allow sleep-deprived nurses, who have the same degree of impairment, to do so.

In 2011, The Joint Commission issued a sentinel event alert on healthcare worker fatigue, advocating that hospitals redesign work schedules to reduce the amount of dangerous extended-shift work. It also encouraged hospitals to develop teamwork plans to support fatigued staff in efforts to improve patient safety. Furthermore, we need to consider the impact of fatigue as we examine the causes of adverse events. (See Factors in drug-administration errors.)

Using checklists

In light of our abundant distractions, it's not surprising nurses are prone to errors of omission. Checklists have emerged as valuable tools in reducing omissions. One study found simple checklists for central line-insertion and daily goals directed at preventing infection significantly reduced central-line bloodstream infections in a critical care unit.

Some people criticize checklists as "cookbook medicine" and suspect they suppress critical thinking. …

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