The Contribution of Social Capital into the Activities of Real Estate Companies in Vietnam

By Nguyen, Hoai Trong; Huynh, Dien Thanh | Journal of International Business Research, December 2012 | Go to article overview

The Contribution of Social Capital into the Activities of Real Estate Companies in Vietnam


Nguyen, Hoai Trong, Huynh, Dien Thanh, Journal of International Business Research


INTRODUCTION

According to the General Statistics Office (2010), real estate is one of the industries of high growth in the economy of Vietnam, but the number of small and medium enterprises account for 88%. This implies that real estate companies in Vietnam lack financial capital while tools for its funding are limited. Therefore, it depends very much on the credit markets. In the context of Vietnam's economy facing inflation from 2009 to 2011, the Government has issued many policies tightening funding channels from customers (Anh, 2010). Meanwhile, the capital mobilization channel in the form of links among market participants has not been paid attention by the Government of Vietnam.

On the other hand, the behavior of real estate companies is driven more by personal relationships between their leaders and government officials concerning access to land. Therefore, understanding of those companies about the role of relationship is distorted. As a result, they have not exploited the relationships optimally and efficiently to serve their business operations.

In this context, current theories of social capital cannot solve the practical problems of establishing a policy framework which helps real estate companies and the Government recognize and measure resources existing in the relations of the company, as well as point out the contribution of social capital into activities of the real estate companies. By doing so, it helps companies identify and plan programs to develop social capital to serve the business activities. Therefore, the objective of this research is to develop a theoretical framework and test the relationship between social capital and the operation of real estate companies in Vietnam. The research findings suggest policies to improve their performance through the efficient use of social capital.

LITERATURE REVIEW AND CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

Theories about social capital

Social capital is an intangible resource that exists in relationships. Many researchers such as Coleman (1988, 1990), Putnam (1995, 2000), and Nahapiet and Ghosal (1998) defines social capital as a form of resources which exists in the network of quality relationships (such as trust, sharing, support) among participants. Social capital is studied in many different levels such as nations, communities and businesses.

Studies of social capital in the business referred to each individual aspect of social capital, including the quality of external, internal, and the company's leadership networks, which are summarized as follows:

External social capital:

The study by Jansen et al (2011), Landry et al (2000) refers to external social capital as the quality of relationships between enterprises and other entities in horizontal networks (customers, distributors, suppliers, companies in the same group, consultants, researchers, the competitors in the industry) and vertical networks (governments at all levels and parent companies--subsidiary companies in the same group). These studies have not established scale of relationship quality for each entity in the network, but instead refer to the quality of business relationships with external entities in general. With these scale, it is very hard for enterprises to develop and evaluate external social capital.

Internal social capital

Studies about internal social capital considered mutual relationship between individuals and divisions within the company, such as research of Schenkel and Garrison (2009), Nisbet (2007), Cheng et al (2006). These studies view internal social capital in terms of quality relationships among staff and functions. However, these studies have not developed the scale and assessed impacts of internal social capital to the operating results of the business. Therefore, they have not suggested approaches to measure and use social capital to serve business activities.

Social capital from leaders

Recent studies such as McCallum and O'Connell (2009), Truss and Gill (2009), Pare & et al (2008), Wharton and Brunetto (2009), Cialdini & et al (2001), Tushman and O 'Reilly III (1997) mentioned the social capital of leadership as the quality of networks of leaders such as friendship, reciprocity, power, social recognition, commitment.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Contribution of Social Capital into the Activities of Real Estate Companies in Vietnam
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.