Laboratory Session to Improve First-Year Pharmacy Students' Knowledge and Confidence concerning the Prevention of Medication Errors

By Kiersma, Mary E.; Darbishire, Patricia L. et al. | American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, October 2009 | Go to article overview

Laboratory Session to Improve First-Year Pharmacy Students' Knowledge and Confidence concerning the Prevention of Medication Errors


Kiersma, Mary E., Darbishire, Patricia L., Plake, Kimberly S., Oswald, Christopher, Walters, Brenda M., American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education


INTRODUCTION

The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Quality of Health Care in America ranked medical errors as the eighth leading cause of death in the United States. (1) In addition, the IOM reported an increase in adverse drug events due to medication errors, suggesting the need for greater recognition and prevention of medication errors by future pharmacists. (1) The IOM acknowledged that medical errors are often due to problems embedded in inadequately designed healthcare systems rather than as a result of negligent healthcare practitioners, which indicates a need to implement systems to decrease medical errors. (1,2)

Patient safety should be of prime concern in all areas of pharmacy practice. (3-7) Pharmacists should be encouraged to develop and improve safe and effective medication use techniques. (4-7) When providing pharmaceutical care, it is a pharmacist's responsibility to direct patients to valid sources of information and safe medication use, since medication information commonly available to patients is often inaccurate, difficult to interpret, or inconsistent with principles of cultural sensitivity. (5-11) The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) has provided leadership on safe medication use, resulting in their support of innovations that establish and expand interprofessional models for educating students on patient safety. (4) The AACP encouraged pharmacy faculty members to lead a national collaborative approach to medication safety research that extends beyond measuring accuracy and investigates the components of a broader definition of errors. (11)

Pharmacy students should be educated to support safe medication practices in various settings and professionalized to consider patient medication safety as their personal responsibility. The Accreditation Council on Pharmacy Education (ACPE) requires that pharmacy schools ensure that their curricula contain aspects of patient safety. (12) ACPE encourages critical thinking and development of problem-solving skills through the use of laboratory experiences, guided group discussions, and simulated practice experiences. Active-learning strategies should be employed to promote the maturation of skills needed in future pharmacy practice. Instructors are encouraged to experiment with teaching methods based on sound educational principles and best evidence in educational practice and to assess the effectiveness of these methods. (12)

Efforts have been made nationally to incorporate medication error instruction into pharmacy curricula. Based on the results of a national survey of colleges and schools of pharmacy in 2002, the majority of responding institutions embed medication error instruction in pharmacy administration, therapeutics, or law courses. Six domains of medication error instruction (human error, medical errors, medication errors, quality or process improvement, root cause analysis, and failure mode and effects analysis) were identified. (6) A number of schools indicated that instruction in these specific domains was lacking in their curriculum, including: human error (44%), medical errors (32%), root cause analysis (62%), and failure mode and effects analysis (79%). The majority of instruction was didactic with few institutions incorporating active learning within laboratories. Of those using laboratories, specific content was not described. The authors of the survey recommended standardizing medication error instruction. (6)

Medication error instruction is incorporated into each professional year of the curriculum at Purdue University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. In the first year, didactic instruction is coupled with an introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) called Observations in a Community Pharmacy. The 2 activities culminate in a year-end debriefing laboratory, which provides the student with opportunities to demonstrate knowledge, practice skills, and reflect on optimal methods to prevent errors. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Laboratory Session to Improve First-Year Pharmacy Students' Knowledge and Confidence concerning the Prevention of Medication Errors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.