Syria War Is a Joke, but We're Not Laughing

By Hurt, Charles | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 11, 2013 | Go to article overview

Syria War Is a Joke, but We're Not Laughing


Hurt, Charles, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Charles Hurt, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

When it comes to reckless stupidity in Syria, Republican leaders in Congress sure are giving President Obama a run for his money.

So they are in favor of launching war on Syria, but they do not feel strongly enough about it to urge their members to support it? Seriously?

You are willing to put America's firepower and potentially our troops in harm's way for an action you are so lukewarm about that you won't even pick up the phone to convince your fellow members that it is worthy? Wow. Talk about vital commitment.

But Mr. Obama promises a limited engagement, no boots on the ground? Seriously? What happens when Syria declares war back. Or Russia decides to defends her ally? Or Iran decides to fire on the USS Barry floating in the Persian Gulf.

Perhaps the single most basic rule of warfare is that you don't get to choose when to stop fighting. Only your enemy can. All you can do is persuade them with as much pain as possible - a concept that President Truman, thankfully, understood oh so clearly.

But Republicans don't have to go back as far as 1945 to realize this is a dangerous fool's errand. Remember 2003?

That was the last time all these towering statesmen rose in a fury for war. Saddam Hussein had used chemical weapons against his own people. He harbored weapons of mass destruction that could slip into the hands of terrorists.

Oh, to read the strident statements people such as John F. Kerry, Chuck Hagel, Hillary Rodham Clinton and Joseph R. Biden made back then. They sounded every bit as sincere and committed as they do today.

War! they cried. And off to war we went. As always happens in war, things didn't go exactly as planned or hoped. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Syria War Is a Joke, but We're Not Laughing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.