Now Three Are Charged with Slavery Crimes; Men Arrested at Travellers' Site in Newport

South Wales Echo (Cardiff, Wales), September 26, 2013 | Go to article overview

Now Three Are Charged with Slavery Crimes; Men Arrested at Travellers' Site in Newport


Byline: Cathy Owen cathy.owens@walesonline.co.uk

THREE men were last night charged with slavery offences following an investigation at a South Wales travellers' site.

Thomas Doran, Daniel Doran and David Daniel Doran are accused of false imprisonment, conspiracy to hold a person in servitude and conspiracy to require a person to perform forced or compulsory labour, the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) said.

The charges come after a third alleged victim, a 60-year-old man, was recovered from one of the sites being searched by detectives.

The CPS said Thomas Doran will also face an additional charge of kidnapping by fraud.

Catrin Evans, head of complex casework unit, CPS Wales, said: "The Crown Prosecution Service has been working alongside Gwent Police as their investigations under Operation Imperial, an anti-slavery operation set up to investigate allegations of mistreatment, have progressed. In particular, we have been offering advice and guidance to the police since four suspects were arrested on Monday.

"I have now carried out a review of the evidence gathered by Gwent Police in relation to three of these suspects.

"My conclusion is that there is sufficient evidence to charge Thomas Doran, Daniel Doran and David Daniel Doran with false imprisonment, conspiracy to hold a person in servitude and conspiracy to require a person to perform forced or compulsory labour. In addition, there is sufficient evidence to charge Thomas Doran with kidnapping by fraud. In respect of each of these offences, I have also concluded that charges are in the public interest.

"Accordingly, I have authorised Gwent Police to charge the three defendants and they will appear before magistrates on Thursday."

And in a further development in the case, three other men were arrested on suspicion of slavery and servitude offences after a raid on an address in the St Brides area of Newport.

The three latest arrests - a 53-year-old, a 38-year-old and a 20-year-old - bring the number of those arrested as part of Operation Imperial to seven.

A 42-year-old woman has since been bailed pending further inquiries.

The 60-year-old man who was found by police at the address in St Brides was last night being assessed by specialist Red Cross staff at an undisclosed medical facility.

Meanwhile, police continued to search throughout the day yesterday for a body they fear could be buried in farmland at Peterstone Wentlooge, near Marshfield. …

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