Honouring Opposite but Entangled Forces of Feminism through Art

Cape Times (South Africa), October 2, 2013 | Go to article overview

Honouring Opposite but Entangled Forces of Feminism through Art


"AN artist has to be ravished by the archetypal unconscious or there is no art." Marion Woodman, Conscious Femininity.

There's the compliant woman. The one who, as a child, was careful when learning to write to keep the letters between the lines, and who upholds her faith, dutifully baking the bread for Friday night's prayers. The archetypal Eve. Then there's her shadow aspect, the subversive Lilith, who questions, rages and rebels.

Both these female energies are honoured in Cathy Abraham's exhibition Undying Entanglement. The title came gradually and reflects Cathy's love for the resonance of words and her fascination with science.

The word "undying" is more powerful than "living". For the living will ultimately die. But the undying are eternal. The word is like a semantic antidote to death.

Although there are psychological echoes, Cathy uses entanglement in the quantum physics context.

It's a state which occurs when subatomic particles become entangled on interacting with each other.

Curiously, "entanglement seems to occur instantly, even if the particles are on opposite ends of the universe".

The exhibition features installations, videos, paintings and cut-out word panels. Undying Entanglement was born from profound personal losses, material and illusory, and the artist's deep connection with the unwanted and discarded. These losses include the death of a beloved dynamic socialite mother and a complex captain-of-industry father, and the demolition of a family home which became like a living entity.

Mary Oliver writes in her poem, The Journey, that there comes a time when you realise that you have to save the only life you can; your own.

It is through making artworks that become votives to loss and honouring of a prior existence, that Cathy saves her own life. She does this by doing the only thing she believes she can, which is to make art.

Like Oliver who writes in the tradition of Shelley, Keats, Hopkins, Yeats and Whitman, there is something of the ecstatic approach in her art making.

Her influences include the quiet work of the contemplative painter and Taoist Agnes Martin and the polish painter Roman Opalka who obsessively painted and incanted numbers in an attempt to deal with "the problem (is) that we are, and are about not to be. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Honouring Opposite but Entangled Forces of Feminism through Art
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.