Rebecca Cox, the 2013 ACTE Lifetime Achievement Award Winner: Rebecca Cox Was Named the 2013 ACTE Lifetime Achievement Award Winner at ACTE's CareerTech VISION 2012. Rebecca Has Had a Long and Fulfilling Career, and She Is a Passionate Advocate for Career and Technical Education (CTE) and FAGS, as Well as Being a Master at Effectively Implementing Successful Curricula

Techniques, October 2013 | Go to article overview

Rebecca Cox, the 2013 ACTE Lifetime Achievement Award Winner: Rebecca Cox Was Named the 2013 ACTE Lifetime Achievement Award Winner at ACTE's CareerTech VISION 2012. Rebecca Has Had a Long and Fulfilling Career, and She Is a Passionate Advocate for Career and Technical Education (CTE) and FAGS, as Well as Being a Master at Effectively Implementing Successful Curricula


ACTE: What is your educational background? What are you doing now?

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

RC: I have an undergraduate degree from Brigham Young University and a master's degree from Utah State University. I have been teaching in the Alpine School District for 24 years. I am currently serving as CTE department chair, CTE coordinator and FAGS program area specialist for Alpine School District, along with a kill teaching load.

ACTE: What advice would you give to teachers? To students? To administrators?

RC: To students: Use high school to explore every possible career option, do internships, take a variety of classes, try as many things as you can. College is a very expensive place to do career exploration.

To teachers: Help your students see the possibilities. Help them see career possibilities in their passion. Whether you, teach English or agriculture, you can help kids find the correct path to their rut Lire! Find passion in your teaching; if you can't, then find another job. Don't get so caught up in your curriculum that you forget the kids and their needs--just because you think something is important doesn't mean they feel the same way. Find out what is important to them.

To administrators: Help your teachers (especially non-CTP understand the impact they can have on their students' futures. Sometimes teachers get so caught up in their curricula they forget kids are passing through and are looking toward the future, not just the moment. Support your CTE programs because the impact on students is amazing!

ACTE: Why is CTE important?

RC: With few exceptions, every career is through the CTE realm. Kids need junior high and high school to explore these possibilities. At our school we try to remind all teachers they are CTE teachers. Every teacher has the opportunity to help kids with career direction.

ACTE: What drives you to keep teaching every day?

RC: The kids. I had a chance to take another job a few years ago, but I wasn't ready to leave. I love dances and football games. The marching band still gives me chills, and I love beginnings and endings. I still get butterflies when school starts and cry at graduation. I'm so excited to see where these kids go, and I love to bear from them as they continue on in life. It's so strange that I couldn't wait to get out of high school, and now I never want to leave!

ACTE: Besides teaching, what's your passion?

RC: Family, gardening and travel. I have no children of my own so 111V sister has graciously allowed me to be a big part of my nieces' lives. As a family we love to travel. My niece and I spent an amazing week in Hawaii celebrating her high school graduation. I'm more about experiences than about things. I love gardening and yard work. I love water, dirt and sun! My dream retirement job would be gardening at Disneyworld in the very early morning hours before the park opens. …

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Rebecca Cox, the 2013 ACTE Lifetime Achievement Award Winner: Rebecca Cox Was Named the 2013 ACTE Lifetime Achievement Award Winner at ACTE's CareerTech VISION 2012. Rebecca Has Had a Long and Fulfilling Career, and She Is a Passionate Advocate for Career and Technical Education (CTE) and FAGS, as Well as Being a Master at Effectively Implementing Successful Curricula
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