Artists Guilds: Helping Artists Develop and Sell Their Work

By Jacobs, Julie | Art Business News, Fall 2013 | Go to article overview

Artists Guilds: Helping Artists Develop and Sell Their Work


Jacobs, Julie, Art Business News


Artistry in New Jersey's Woodbridge Township is thriving, thanks in part to the Woodbridge Artisan Guild (WAG). The nonprofit arts cooperative, nestled among neighborhood businesses on the towns Main Street, features art in many forms, from sculpture and painting to glasswork and photography. A variety of pieces adorns the walls and lines the perimeter, and the guild has furnished studio space in the rear to host classes and event receptions.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Since its inception in 2009, WAG has supported and nurtured the visual arts, increased awareness and appreciation, and provided artists with opportunities to develop and sell their work. And it's not alone in its mission. Artists guilds exist nationwide in small communities and large cities alike. Although many have been around for decades, more and more are cropping up with each passing year.

"Most of our members are emerging artists who have never shown their work in public. Here, they can get feedback and confidence," notes Glenn Murgacz, metal sculptor and current WAG president. "As artists, we enjoy discussing art and learning from one another."

Mountain Artists Guild and Gallery (MAGG) in Prescott, Ariz., holds the same sentiment. Established in 1949, MAGG is one of the oldest artists guilds in the state and includes painters, sculptors, ceramicists, wood turners and more among its membership.

"We've grown significantly since our early days, but we're still essentially about the sharing of ideas and supporting one another," says Donna Carver, a painter, printmaker and mixed-media artist who sits on MAGG's board of directors and gallery committee and serves as liaison between the two entities. "Our members get to broaden their experience and become more professional as artists. We can help them put together a portfolio and mount and frame pieces and also teach them about what's involved with customer sales."

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Business skills aside, all artists need ways and places to network and display their work as a means toward potential sales. Some artists guilds sponsor or co-sponsor community-based shows featuring members' art, and some join forces with restaurants and other area merchants to bring exhibits into the neighborhood. Others, such as WAG and MAGG, also have their own buildings that include gallery space.

The Rockford Art Guild (RAG) in Illinois, formed in 1955 and located about 90 miles from Chicago, meets monthly at a local lunch spot. It does not pay a fee to do so; in exchange for the room, it decorates the walls of the coffee shop with art by guild members, varying the artists every month. RAG represents a variety of media--from painting and photography to jewelry and digital art--which it shows at spring and fall ArtScene gallery walks. This year, the guild held its first Downtown Artist/Artisan Market, taking over all three floors of the towns Veterans Memorial Hall.

"We also did some boutique shows, such as a nature-themed show at a new conservatory, and got a lot of good press and exposure," says Barbara Berney, a jewelry and digital artist who just ended her term as president on Sept.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Artists Guilds: Helping Artists Develop and Sell Their Work
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.