Dear Mr. Knightley

By Puterbaugh, Dolores T. | USA TODAY, September 2013 | Go to article overview

Dear Mr. Knightley


Puterbaugh, Dolores T., USA TODAY


BY KATHERINE REAY

THOMAS NELSON/HARPERCOLLINS

2013, 336 PAGES, $15.99 (PAPERBACK)

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Dear Mr. Knightly easily is dismissed as either one more Jane Austen knockoff, feeding off the Cult of Austen (of which I am a member), or an interesting--and sometimes maddening hybrid-of modern, self-absorbed chick lit; a sly challenge to find all the allusions to great English literature; an implausible, albeit lovely, plot with a nod to William Shakespeare (as well as Austen and the Bronte sisters); and, finally, an intriguing exploration of 23-year-old Sam's maturation and healing process from a childhood of abuse and neglect.

I will not deprive readers of the fun of identifying all the various elements borrowed from great British authors. That is a valid enough reason for a good book discussion group to read this tome. For those interested in the psychological aspects of the book, there is much to appreciate. Sam is a lonely, unhappy child finding a safer existence within the life of the imagination; she avoids emotional contact via presenting aspects of characters that seem to fit the needs of the situation. This allows her to maintain the rigid interpersonal boundaries that made perfect sense in the world of battering abuse and neglect of her childhood and teen years. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dear Mr. Knightley
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.