Ken Cuccinelli, the Virginian; Terry McAuliffe's Democratic Roots Reach All the Way to Hollywood

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 22, 2013 | Go to article overview

Ken Cuccinelli, the Virginian; Terry McAuliffe's Democratic Roots Reach All the Way to Hollywood


Byline: Mary Claire Kendall, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

It's tempting to call what's going on in the Virginia gubernatorial race entertainment, mirroring the dysfunction across the Potomac River in the nation's capital. It is, unfortunately, real. The outcome will shape the political landscape for years to come, impacting not only the 2014 elections - given the morale and policy boost - but more importantly, the critical 2016 presidential race.

Will the other half of the Clinton power partnership - Hillary Rodham Clinton - sit in the White House, thanks to her buddy Terry McAuliffe working from his perch in the Richmond governor's mansion, when she seeks the presidency?

Or will a Republican with the seriousness of purpose of a Gov. Ken Cuccinelli, radiating out over the Virginia Commonwealth, occupy the White House come Jan. 20, 2017, thanks to rising Republican leadership?

Make no mistake: Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli is by far the better candidate for governor than Mr. McAuliffe.

How, though, to get past the lies?

There's that famous line uttered by Gary Cooper's character in The Virginian (1929), the first Western talkie, based on the novel by Owen Wister: If you wanna call me that - smile.

Mr. Cuccinelli could say the same to Mr. McAuliffe, who is attempting to distract from his nonexistent governing record by lobbing untruths about the attorney general.

Mrs. Clinton, ending her five-year political hiatus, endorsed Mr. McAuliffe at a rally on Oct. 19, in Falls Church, Va. I believe Terry has what it takes to lead Virginia forward in this rapidly changing world, she roared.

The Northern Virginia Technology Council PAC (Tech PAC), which endorsed Mr. Cuccinelli last month, begs to differ.

When Tech PAC met with Mr. McAuliffe, he was uninformed, superficial, flamboyant, no details, all [expletive deleted], The Washington Post reported. On the other hand, the council found Mr. Cuccinelli precise, serious and detail-oriented.

The Tech PAC endorsement of Mr. Cuccinelli undermines the credentials that Mr. McAuliffe's campaign touts as the basis for his bid for the governorship - that he is a lifelong pro-business entrepreneur whose administration will be all about jobs.

The reaction of Team McAuliffe - warning that the state's doors will be closed to Tech PAC if the organization sticks with its endorsement - also underscores how Mr. …

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