Edward Snowden on Line Two

By Stein, Jeff | Newsweek, October 25, 2013 | Go to article overview

Edward Snowden on Line Two


Stein, Jeff, Newsweek


Byline: Jeff Stein

Of all the vituperation directed at NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, some of the harshest has come from Mike Rogers, the Republican chairman of the House Intelligence Committee. "A traitor," Rogers called him, a "liar" who "overinflated his position... overinflated his access, and he's even overinflated what the actual technology of the [NSA] programs would allow one to do. It's impossible for him to do what he was saying he could do."

At a panel discussion early this month, Rogers laughed at a joke by former NSA and CIA chief Michael Hayden about his dark fantasy of putting Snowden on a kill list. "I can help you with that," he chuckled, as the audience howled.

And yet this week Rogers, a former FBI special agent, very carefully indicated that he's willing to talk to Snowden, the 30-year-old ex-NSA and CIA computer technician who has unloaded a startling cache of documents about NSA spying - with much more to come, according to his associates.

Thomas Drake, a former senior NSA official and whistleblower, met with the uber-leaker recently in Moscow. "I am fairly confident that he would consider it if formally invited and could do so through safe channels," Drake said by e-mail. "However, instead of being invited to brief secret committees who have been complicit in NSA's surveillance programs, I think he is much more inclined to provide public testimony on the record."

When told by Newsweek that Snowden appears to be willing to testify, Susan Phalen, the House Intelligence Committee spokeswoman, said (after conferring with her boss): "If Edward Snowden is saying he'd like to talk to the House Intelligence Committee, Chairman Rogers would entertain that request."

A spokesman for Senator Dianne Feinstein, D-California, chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said she had no comment when Newsweek asked if she'd take testimony from Snowden via a secure video link. In June, she called his leaks "an act of treason."

Billion-Dollar Overruns

Drake, who was prosecuted by the feds on a nearly century-old espionage statute after leaking details of massive cost overruns on an NSA spying program to a reporter, said an invitation to Snowden from the intelligence committees would be a first: Neither panel has ever invited an NSA whistleblower to testify.

Louis Clark, president of the Government Accountability Project, a Washington, D.C.-based organization which advocates on the behalf of whistleblowers, says it's time for the intelligence committees to hear dissident voices. "Despite the fact that there's a lot of information [from Snowden] out there, we don't see a lot of evidence that the [NSA] inspector general, for example, is dealing with these issues in any official way," Clark says. "If they are, fine, but we don't know that.

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