Why Did the Self-Styled Lady of the Manor Strip off at Airport Security?

Daily Mail (London), November 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Why Did the Self-Styled Lady of the Manor Strip off at Airport Security?


Byline: Jaya Narain

AS the self-styled lady of the manor, Kelly Hadfield-Hyde may be more accustomed to issuing orders than receiving them.

So when a guard at an airport security scanner asked her to remove her clothing before passing through she took his request a little too literally.

She began to peel off her clothing - only stopping when she had removed her bra.

Yesterday Lady Kelly Hadfield-Hyde, 50, appeared in court charged with causing a disturbance at Manchester Airport.

But the outraged Lady of Alderley told the court she was only following the orders of the security guard.

Magistrates in Trafford saw CCTV footage of the incident which took place in Terminal One of the airport around 6am on December 3. Hadfield-Hyde and Ann Chadwick, 48, had been due to catch a flight to Malaga along with a friend who was travelling with a young child.

In the footage of them going through security, Hadfield-Hyde and Chadwick appeared to exchange conversation with airport security staff as they took off their coats and belts and placed them on trays.

A minute or so passes before both suddenly begin taking off their clothes, stripping down to their bras before Hadfield-Hyde removes hers.

Hadfield-Hyde told the court that security guard Abdullah Mayet had indicated that she should take off all her clothes before passing through the scanner.

She said: 'He was pointing at me saying, "Off". I said to him, "Do you mean just my jacket?", but he was saying, "Off, off, all off".' The court heard that when more airport security staff arrived in an attempt to defuse the situation both women became abusive and swore at them.

Other staff were called to the scene and after a few minutes the women were finally persuaded to put their clothes back on.

Both women were later arrested and charged with the public order offence of causing a disturbance. Hadfield-Hyde denied she was drunk. She accused Mr Mayet, who has worked at the airport for five years, of having a poor command of English.

But Mr Mayet said his instructions had been clear and he had never asked the women to strip completely. …

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