Snowden's Inconvenient Truth about Spies; Everybody Does It, but Nobody Does It like Barack Obama

By Keene, David A. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 5, 2013 | Go to article overview

Snowden's Inconvenient Truth about Spies; Everybody Does It, but Nobody Does It like Barack Obama


Keene, David A., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: David A. Keene, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Although many Americans continue to regard Edward Snowden as some sort of traitor, he is seen increasingly by many in Europe as a whistleblowing hero, and for Russia's Vladimir Putin, he is the gift that keeps on giving.

No longer hiding, Mr. Snowden is becoming more and more visible in Moscow, where last week it was announced that he's landed a job with one of Russia's social-networking firms, is increasingly willing to meet with reporters and was even spotted playing the tourist on a Moscow riverboat.

When Mr. Putin's government originally decided to thumb its nose at President Obama by granting the fugitive National Security Agency (NSA) contractor the right to remain in Russia without fear of extradition for at least a year, the Russians relished sticking it to the U.S. president, but apparently didn't expect what's come since.

Mr. Putin said famously at the time that trying to squeeze much benefit out of the affair would be like sheering a pig ... there is lots of squealing and little wool. The Russian president must not have known at the time what Mr. Snowden had arranged to turn over to Western press outlets before landing in Moscow early last summer or he might used a different analogy.

Since then, of course, Mr. Snowden's revelations have shocked many in Congress, put U.S. intelligence officers and administration officials on the spot, disrupted Washington's relations with our most reliable allies, and allowed Mr. Putin, a former KGB operative, and Russian officials to act like outraged ACLU members shocked at the extent of U.S. spying. Russia even went so far as to host the Sam Adams Awards in October, at which Mr. Snowden was honored for promoting integrity in intelligence.

American defenders of NSA spying continue to argue in the face of outrage in Germany, France, Spain and elsewhere that it is hypocritical for any of these nation's leaders to act shocked at learning that governments spy not only on their enemies and adversaries, but their friends. To an extent, they are right. In the real world, gentlemen do read each other's mail, and Europeans have plenty of experience with the organs of state security in their own countries.

The outrage, however, is real and seems to stem from a feeling that neither the East German Stasi, Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Snowden's Inconvenient Truth about Spies; Everybody Does It, but Nobody Does It like Barack Obama
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.