US Navy Christens New $12.8-Billion Aircraft Carrier

Manila Bulletin, November 10, 2013 | Go to article overview

US Navy Christens New $12.8-Billion Aircraft Carrier


by: Mathieu Rabechault Washington The American navy christened Saturday a new aircraft carrier, the USS Gerald Ford, a colossal ship plagued by equally huge cost overruns, at a time of growing budget pressures. The daughter of the former US president, Susan Ford Bales, broke the traditional champagne bottle at a ceremony in the port of Newport News, Virginia, near the sprawling Norfolk naval base. The problem project, however, will be plain to see construction of the vessel is only 70 percent complete and its delivery has been postponed to February, 2016. While fewer sailors will be needed to run the carrier, the cost of building the ship has sky-rocketed. Since the start of the contract in 2008, construction costs jumped 22 percent over the scheduled budget to $12.8 billion in total. And the Navy's estimate ''does not include $4.7 billion in research and development costs,'' according to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), which provides financial data to lawmakers. Navy officers say such cost overruns are typical for a new series of ship, and that the price of subsequent vessels in the class tend to drop. And faced with automatic budget cuts and the need to fund other programs, including submarines, the Navy's chief of staff, Admiral Jonathan Greenert has warned the service may have to delay completing the Ford ''by two years.'' The move would force the United States to rely on a fleet of 10 existing carriers and mean ''lowering surge capacity'' in a crisis, he added. US law requires the military to maintain 11 aircraft carriers, but at the moment only 10 are available since the retirement of the USS Enterprise in 2012. The current carrier fleet, launched between 1975 to 2009, are Nimitz class ships, but the Ford, or CVN 78, represents a new class of carrier with a new design, which will be followed by the John F. Kennedy and new Enterprise carriers. All have a similar length of about 1,090 feet (330 meters). The Ford-class design is supposed to allow for 25 percent more sorties for the fighter jets and helicopters on board, generate more electrical power and produce more fresh water from desalination systems, allowing sailors to take comfortable showers.

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US Navy Christens New $12.8-Billion Aircraft Carrier
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