New York Times Thinks Obama Should Emulate Jerry Brown!

By Mass, Warren | The New American, November 4, 2013 | Go to article overview

New York Times Thinks Obama Should Emulate Jerry Brown!


Mass, Warren, The New American


ITEM: The editorial board of the New York Times published an editorial on October 6 headlined "Fixing Immigration From the Ground Up" that said: "Immigration reform--remember immigration reform?--is among the many pieces of business that remain unfinished while Congress is in lockdown."

The editors continued: "As this stalemate continues, those seeking positive action should look to California, where a Democratic governor Jerry Brown, a Democratic-controlled Legislature and a Republican Party conspicuously lacking in Tea Partyers have made strides in advancing a sensible immigration agenda. ... California--home to an estimated 2.5 million undocumented immigrants--is setting a good example."

Among the "accomplishments" the Times editors heap kudos on Brown for are "a law that will make it harder for federal agents to detain and deport unauthorized Californians who are non-criminals or minor offenders and pose no threat," and "a bill to allow driver's licenses for undocumented immigrants, which advocates welcomed as a means to safer roads and greater economic opportunity."

The Times editors also take President Obama to task for apparently being too conservative in comparison to the enlightened Governor Brown: "President Obama is on the brink of setting an ugly record--the deportation during his time in office of two million people, of whom only a fraction are dangerous criminals. More than 100,000 people have been deported since the Senate passed its bill in June."

CORRECTION: Lost in the Times editorial and in Jerry Brown's politicking is the fact that "undocumented" is merely a euphemism for "illegal" immigrant. The crossing of an international border in violation of the immigration laws of the destined country is, by definition, illegal immigration.

If someone sneaks into an entertainment or sporting event without a ticket, it is commonly understood that the gatecrasher has no legal right to be there and, if caught, is immediately expelled. Yet, advocates of "immigration reform" often campaign for granting various privileges to people who are within our borders illegally, which is not only a crime in itself, but which often results in the commission of related crimes. An October 2013 Backgrounder written by Jon Feere, the legal policy analyst at the Center for Immigration Studies, headlined "The Myth of the 'Otherwise Law-Abiding' Illegal Alien," detailed the many statutes that many illegal aliens who are simply "here to work" may be violating, most commonly:

  False Personation of a U.S. Citizen (18 U.S.C. [section] 911).
  (Illegal aliens often present themselves as U.S. citizens.);
  Fraud and False Statements (18 U.S.C. [section] 1001). (It is
  common for illegal aliens to make false statements to the
  government or on official documents.) and;

  Social Security Fraud (42 U.S.C. [section] 408). (This statute
  has been invoked where an illegal alien provided a false
  Social Security number for the purpose of acquiring a job.)

This is not mere legal "nit-picking," however, since the presence of large numbers of illegal immigrants in a community poses real economic burdens resulting from providing educational, medical, and social services to the immigrants and their children, and from the increased cost of additional law enforcement related to crimes committed by illegal immigrants beyond the crime of entering here illegally. …

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New York Times Thinks Obama Should Emulate Jerry Brown!
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