Scoring Points with Sports Fans and History Fans

By Borman, Laurie D. | American Libraries, November-December 2013 | Go to article overview

Scoring Points with Sports Fans and History Fans


Borman, Laurie D., American Libraries


On a clear autumn day, I sit on my balcony reading a book when I hear a muffled cheer and see fireworks erupt. Moments later, a slightly delayed TV signal repeats the same sounds from the Chicago Bears game at nearby Soldier Field. All day, people in orange and blue shirts parade down the streets, beading for the stadium or just to grab lunch and watch the game on TV. Switch out the jerseys and it's a ritual repeated all across the US. For those of us who left our team-cheering days behind at college, this is quite eyeopening. I'm lost after singing the first line of the Bears fight song and certainly know nothing of building my own fantasy football team. But I'm in the minority. This is a great way to get--let's face it--a primarily adult male audience into the library. In this issue, Adam Doster tells us how to tap into this avid fan base to research, read, and slot their fantasy sports teams at your library. Cheek out all his suggestions on page 30.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Each November 22 we recall with sadness the day when President John F. Kennedy was shot. Whether you are researching his final White House days, or want to help students learn more about his stand on civil rights and the space race, the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum is working to get that information digitized, just in time for the 50th anniversary of his assassination. With documents, films, audio recordings, and photos, the library already provides 150 terabytes of information on its website. …

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Scoring Points with Sports Fans and History Fans
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